The Year of the Hangman

By: Gary Blackwood

Main Conflict

Creighton wants to discover which side to be loyal to, but both sides have shown pros and cons, so he explores both sides.

Setting

The main setting of The Year of the Hangman is the American Colonies in 1777.

Main Character

  • Creighton Brown is the main character. His role in the story is a very self-confident teenager who needs to find out which side-(Americans or Brits)-to go to.

Event 1

Creighton gets captured and taken to a ship where he is taken to the American colonies (Chapter 1-2). This event is important to the conflict because it shows that the Americans are trying to get Creighton to go to their side by capturing him and forcing him to come with them.

Event 2

Creighton finds Dr. Franklin's house, and meets him for the first time. He went there because he had no where to stay, because his uncle had abandoned him before (Chapter 7). This event is important to the conflict because Ben Franklin, an American, takes him in, and allows him to live there for a while if Creighton works for him.

Event 3

Creighton breaks Lieutenant Hale and Cornell Gower out of jail and wants to go with Gower, but his uncle hits him on the head with a pistol, and Creighton gets left behind (Chapter 13). This event is important to the conflict because it sways his opinion on the Brits, so it makes him feel like he should lean towards the Americans.

Event 4

Cornell Gower is mad at Creighton for deciphering the codes. He wanted his uncle to be proud of him, but he wasn't (Chapter 20). This event is important to the conflict because it shows that his uncle, who is a British soldier, isn't satisfied with what he did. It again shows that the Brits are somewhat rude.

Event 5

George Washington switches sides from the Americans to the Britains, and tells the Brits the Americans' plans. He gets hung not too long after he arrives to the Brits, and is soon buried (Chapter 22). This event is important to the conflict because it shows that George Washington was a traitor, and that doesn't make George Washington look good.