Symbiosis

By Kaylea Kuhlman

Definition of Symbiosis

Symbiosis is any relationship when two species live closely together. One species in each relationship is always benefited.

Types of Symbiosis

  • Mutualism- This type of Symbiosis occurs when both species are benefited from the relationship.
  • Commensalism- In this type, one species benefit from the relationship and the other is neither helped nor harmed.
  • Parasitism- In the relationship one organism benefits and the other is harmed.

5 examples

Mutualism

In this symbiosis relationship the butterfly pollinates the flower and sends pollen from one place to another. The flower gives the butterfly the nutrients in the form of nectar. Both of the organisms are helped which is why it is a mutual relationship.


http://scienceprojectideasforkids.com/2010/symbiosis-butterflies-flowers/

http://animal-council.blogspot.com/

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Commensalism

This example of a symbiosis relationship is a decorator crab and a sea sponge. The crab is benefitted by camouflaging itself with the sea sponge and is protected. The sea sponge is not affected by the crab.


http://www.buzzle.com/articles/examples-of-commensalism.html

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Parasitism

In this example of a symbiosis the catalpa worm is being harmed by the braconid wasp. The wasp lays its eggs on the back of the worm and when they hatch, they feed on the worm. The larvae eggs are benefited and the catalpa worm is harmed.


http://w3.marietta.edu/~biol/biomes/symbiosis.htm

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Mutualism

This sea anemone and clown fish show a mutual relationship because the fish gives the anemone nutrients, cleans it, and not attracting predatory fish to the Anemone. The sea anemone stings the clown fish which protects it from predators because a mucus is covered around the body. The fish also has its meals off of the anemone's leftovers. Both of the organisms are benefited in this relationship.


http://www.asknature.org/strategy/fb410d8500af30a5daf5b647954b7fa5

http://tonusperegrinus.blogspot.com/

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Commensalism

This picture shows a whale and barnacle having a commensalism relationship. Barnacle live their life on the whale's tail. The barnacle is benefited because it is protected and has an easy ability to go from area to area to get its food. The whale is neither benefited nor harmed from barnacle being stuck to its tail.


http://animals.mom.me/symbiotic-relationship-between-barnacle-living-whales-skin-10968.html

https://www.emaze.com/@ALIZFCTT/Our%C2%A0ScienceProject
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