WANTED

SULFUR IS WANTED FOR PRESERVING FOODS AND MAKING MATCHES.

DESCRIPTION OF SULFUR.

Sulfur is a soft, yellow, crumbly material. Sulfur melts at one hundred and fifteen degrees Celsius, but because sulfur is a poor conductor of heat, it takes a while to melt completely. Sulfur, when combined with air and nitrogen oxide, can come down from the sky as acid rain. Their way to contact each other is "S8(s) + 8O2(g) → 8SO2(g)." The atomic mass of sulfur is 32.06 and the atomic number is 16. Sulfur is non-metal and a solid at room temperature. The first arresting officer of sulfur was Antoine-Laurent Laviosier in 1787. Sulfur was discovered by testing out gunpowder in Ancient China. Known allies are halogens, air, molten sulfur, and potassium hydroxide. Sulfur was last seen in the Chalogen family, also known as the oxygen family. This element makes up 0.05% of the Earth's crust and is the tenth most abundant element in the world. Sulfur's aliases are brimestone, sulfuric acid, and sulfate.

WARNING!

Sulfur in its pure form is not harmful, but it can be if used in the wrong way!

BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Knapp, Brian J., David Woodroffe, and David A. Hardy. Elements. Danbury, CT: Grolier Educational, 1996. Print.


"Sulfur." Science in Context. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Sept. 2015.


"Key Facts about Sulfur." Science in Context. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Sept. 2015.


Pictures:


Match. N.d. Pixlbay. Web.


Bohr diagram. N.d. Pixlbay. Web.


Sulfur. N.d. Pixlbay. Web.