Chemical Communication

Abby Robinson

What is chemical communication?

Well, communication, the passing of information from one organism to another, is a crucial part of life for all living things, especially in animal societies. Chemical communication is a more elaborate way of communication that involves smell and taste. Most forms of chemical communication involves pheromones, or chemical marks that are left behind. Pheromones can be found in glands nearly all over the body and also in body wastes.
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Scratch that

Canada lynxes urinate on trees to mark their territory. As well as urinating on trees, they also leave claw marks. Although claw marks seem like a form of visual communication, it can also be a form of chemical communication. Some animals' claws have chemical scents within them, so the scent is left behind when a scratch is made, marking their territory.


Photo:

http://www.fws.gov/midwest/twincities/images/mammals/lynx/calyByDennis%20Donohue.jpg

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An Alarming Sting

Another form of alarm signalling is in bee stings. The pheromones in the sting not only has the purpose of wounding the threat, but also to warn other bees of the intruder. The bees receive the signal and are automatically triggered to swarm and attack the enemy. "Killer bees" aren't necessarily lethal only because of their slightly venomous sting but also due to the pheromones released by the stings that cause more bees to attack and continuously sting the target. The multiple stings harm the enemy even more and ultimately may kill the predator.


Photo:

https://pastortimfowler.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/killer-bees.jpg