Teenage Pregnancy

Ulysses Cadet & Xavier Motley

Teen Pregnancy in the United States

In 2012, a total of 305,388 babies were born to women aged 15–19 years, for a live birth rate of 29.4 per 1,000 women in this age group.1 This is a record low for U.S. teens in this age group, and a drop of 6% from 2011. Birth rates fell 8% for women aged 15–17 years, and 5% for women aged 18–19 years. While reasons for the declines are not clear, teens seem to be less sexually active, and more of those who are sexually active seem to be using birth control than in previous years.

10 More Facts oO

  1. 1. 3 in 10 teen American girls will get pregnant at least once before age 20. That’s nearly 750,000 teen pregnancies every year.
  2. 2. Parenthood is the leading reason that teen girls drop out of school. More than 50% of teen mothers never graduate from high school. Aid young parents by starting a Babysitters Club so they can take GED classes.
  3. 3. About 25% of teen moms have a 2nd child within 24 months of their first baby.
  4. 4. Less than 2% of teen moms earn a college degree by age 30.
  5. 5. The United States has one of the highest teen pregnancy rates in the western industrialized world.
  6. 6. In 2011, the teen birthrate in the United States fell to the lowest level recorded in nearly 70 years of tracking teen childbearing.
  7. 7. In 2008 the teen pregnancy rate among African-American and Hispanic teen girls, age 15 to 19, was over two and a half times higher than the teen pregnancy rate among white teen girls of the same age group.
  8. 8. 8 out of 10 teen dads don’t marry the mother of their child.
  9. 9. A sexually active teen who doesn’t use contraceptives has a 90% chance of becoming pregnant within a year.
  10. 10. Almost 50% of teens have never considered how a pregnancy would affect their lives.

Repricussions

Teen pregnancy is an important issue for several reasons. For example, there arehealth risks for the baby, and children born to teenage mothers are more likely to suffer health, social, and emotional problems than children born to older mothers. Also, women who become pregnant during their teens are at increased risk for medical complications, such as premature labor, and social concequences

Teenage Pregnancy

Teenage pregnancy is pregnancy in human females under the age of 20 at the time that the pregnancy ends. A pregnancy can take place after the start of the puberty before first menstrual period but usually occurs after the onset of periods. In well-nourished girls, menarche usually takes place around the age of 12 or 13.

Pregnant teenagers face many of the sameobstetricsissues as other women. There are, however, additional medical concerns for mothers aged under 15. For mothers aged 15–19, risks are associated more with socioeconomic factors than with the biological effects of age. Risks of low birth weight, premature labor, anemia, and pre-eclampsia are connected to the biological age itself, as it was observed in teen births even after controlling for other risk factors (such as utilization of antenatal care etc.)

In develpoed countriesteenage pregnancies are often associated with social issues including lower educational levels, higher rates of poverty, and other poorer life outcomes in children of teenage mothers. Teenage pregnancy in developed countries is usually outside of marriage, and carries a social stigma in many communities and cultures. By contrast, teenage parents in developed countries are often married, and their pregnancies welcomed by family and society. However, in these societies, early pregnancy may combine with malnutrition and poor health care to cause medical problems.