Consumer Rights Act - Updated

Lets take a look at what factors have changed:

On the 1st October 2015, the Consumer Rights Act was updated. This new piece of legislation ties up separate bits of consumer law which includes; the Sales Of Goods Act, Supply Of Goods & Services Act and the Unfair Terms In Consumer Contracts Regulations. This new act is meant to renew all those previous legal rulings into one act, to not only make it easier for customers to understand but also so companies can sell their products/services with confidence.

Consumer Rights for services paid for in a shop

These are; it is your right to ask the company to repeat or fix a service if it has not been carried out with reasonable care and skill, or give you money back if the shop cannot resolve the issue, if you haven't agreed the price for a service or time for a service to be carried out beforehand - what you (as a customer) are asked to pay must be reasonable and the time for it to happen must also be reasonable.
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Consumer Rights for services ordered at home

In 2013 the 'Consumer Contracts Regulations' said that in most cases within 14 days, you can cancel a service but may still be charged. However in 2015 the Consumer Rights Act has concluded that as a customer you can ask the company to repeat or fix a service if it has not been carried out with reasonable care and skill, or give you money back if the shop cannot resolve the issue. If you haven't agreed the price for a service or time for a service to be carried out beforehand - what you (as a customer) are asked to pay must be reasonable and the time for it to happen must also be reasonable.

Goods - Services - Digital Content

Consumer Rights for goods ordered at home

In 2013 the 'Consumer Contracts Regulations' said that in most cases up to 14 days after receiving your goods you can change your mind and get a full refund. But the Consumer Rights Act states that after 30 days if your goods are faulty - you can get a refund and after 6 months if the goods can't be repaired or replaced then it is your right to a full refund in most cases. Also that after 6 years if the goods provided did not last a reasonable period of time you could be entitled to some of your money back.

Satisfactory Quality - Matches the Description - Fit for Purpose

Consumer Rights for goods bought in a shop

The Consumer Rights Act states that after 30 days if your goods are faulty you can get an immediate refund, up to 6 months you are entitled to a full refund in most cases when the goods cannot be repaired or replaced and up to 6 years later if the products provided do not last a rational amount of time you will be permitted to at least some of your money back.

Consumer Rights for digital content

The Contracts Regulations of 2013 specificed that you have a 14 day right to change your mind and to get a full refund on your digital content. However you do not have this entitlement once a download has begun as long as you have been told this and acknowledged this. The updated Consumers Rights Act detailed that if the digital content is faulty you are authorised to a repair or replacement, or if the issue hasn't been resolved or cannot be within a reasonable time and without significant inconvenience, you may get some or all of your money back. If you as a customer provide evidence that the fault has damaged your device and that the company has not used care or skill, you could be given compensation.

More Consumer Rights

Under this new act the key parts of any product or service's terms and conditions must be clear to the customer. If they are hidden away or written in complicated legal jargon, then the company cannot rely on this if the goods break. In the past retailers would avoid paying for broken products by claiming the courier is at fault. But this updated legislation states that the company you buy from is held responsible, including any courier damage, until the moment the product is in your hands. Another recent improvement is the introduction of ombudsmen (an official appointed to investigate individuals' complaints against a company or organisation) to help resolve issues quickly. Shoppers have the choice of using a free-to-use retail ombudsmen or an also free-to-use consumer ombudsmen, to prevent costly court battles.

Now you know your rights, you can shop with confidence