Join the Military today!!!

By: Shawnee Haight

Qualifications

Each branch of the Service has different requirements. Minimum entrance-age requirements are 17 with parental consent or 18 without parental consent. Almost all male U.S. citizens, and male aliens living in the U.S., who are 18 through 25, are required to register with Selective Service. Success in any branch of the Military depends on a good education, and a high school diploma is most desirable. Candidates with a GED can enlist, but some Services may limit opportunities. It is very difficult to be considered a serious candidate without either a high school diploma or accepted alternative credential.

Big image

Military Recruiting

All branches of the military employ recruiters to maintain and build their forces. While recruitment efforts have always focused on young people, the prolonged U.S. military presence in Iraq and Afghanistan has led to criticism of the recruitment of teenagers. A provision of the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act requires high schools that receive federal funding provide information on students to military recruiters, unless the student or parent opts out, which some claim is an invasion of privacy.

Data Minefield

In the past few years, the military has mounted a virtual invasion into the lives of young Americans. Using data mining, stealth websites, career tests, and sophisticated marketing software, the Pentagon is harvesting and analyzing information on everything from high school students' GPAS and sat scores to which video games they play. The Pentagon spends about $600,000 a year on commercial data brokers, notably the Student Marketing Group and the American Student List, which boasts that it has records for 8 million high school students. The Pentagon spends about $600,000 a year on commercial data brokers, notably the Student Marketing Group and the American Student List, which boasts that it has records for 8 million high school students.


Before an Army recruiter even picks up the phone to call a prospect like Travers, the soldier may know more about the kid's habits than do his own parents.


The military has long struggled to find more effective ways to reach potential enlistees; for every new GI it signed up last year, the Army spent $24,500 on recruitment.

How many years?

Most first-term enlistments are four years of Active Duty, followed by four years in the Individual Ready Reserve (IRR). In the IRR, you don’t train, and you live at home maintaining a regular job, but you may be called to duty, if necessary, until your term expires. Service commitment really depends upon the Service and the career to which you’re applying.