East Coastal Africa

Selase, Nick, Lara, and Vianney

Extinct Animal

Pelusios Seychellensis (Seychelles Black Terrapin)

Big image

Animal Information

  • Species habitat:

    • Seychelles: found in shallow waters of soft-bottomed marshes, swamps, streams, rivers, and ponds.

  • Species ecological roles (niche):

    • They eat insects, worms, snails, small fish, amphibians and crabs as well as aquatic plants such as water grasses.

  • Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic):

    • This animal had an ecological value to the region because it lived in the marshes and they helped eat some of the plants and insects and keep those populations under control.

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • Collapse of marsh ecosystems through water lettuce invasion, drainage and predation.

    • Predation by cats and dogs.

    • Extreme pollution in the marshes.

    • Invasive species (water lettuce)

  • Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • The marshes continue to deteriorate with time. Other species within that same ecosystem are going extinct.

  • Rate of loss (is possible):

    • None, because it is already extinct.

Endangered Species

Procolobus Kirkii ( Zanzibar Red Colobus Monkey)

Animal Information

  • Species habitat:

    • Kenya, Mozambique, Somalia, Tanzania

  • Species ecological roles (niche):

    • Zanzibar red colobuses are one of the main folivores and frugivores in the coral-rag forest ecosystem, and play a role in seed dispersal.

  • Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic):

    • Zanzibar red colobuses play an important role in tourism generating at least $100,000 in park fees not only helping support the species but also benefits the government and local community.

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • The major threat of population loss due to habitat destruction resulting from timber felling, charcoal production, clearance for cultivation, and bush-burning. Kirk’s colobus is still occasionally shot for food, sport or as a crop pest, and is also sometimes killed on roads.

  • Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • If the species goes extinct, the local community will need to shut down local national parks and find some other way to attract tourists.

  • Rate of loss (is possible):

    • The total population is estimated to be less than 2,000 individuals currently.

Improved Conservation Status

Ceratotherium simum (Southern White Rhino)

Animal Information

  • Species habitat:

    • southern Africa

      • south africa

      • zimbabwe

      • namibia

      • kenya

    • tropical and subtropical grasslands

    • savannas and shrublands

  • Species ecological roles (niche):

    • constantly grazing

    • distribute seeds (through dung)

  • Value (ecological, socio-political, economic, intrinsic/aesthetic):

    • horns are valuable to humans

      • used for medicine in China

      • ornamental use

        • carved into ceremonial daggers in Middle Eastern countries

    • contribute to economic growth and sustainable development through the tourism industry

      • this creates jobs and benefits local communities

  • Causes for extinction or endangerment (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • poaching

      • main threat today

      • south africa number of rhinos poached from 2007 to 2011

        • 13, 83, 122, 333, 448

        • if the trend is not reversed, population could start to decline again starting in 2016

    • hunting for their horns

      • psuedohunting (sport hunting)

    • habitat loss

      • due to agriculture and settlements

    • cost of conservation

      • illegal poaching is increasing causing the price of security to increase as well which decreases incentive to protect the rhino

  • Conservation Action:

    • ecotourism, limited sport hunting, and live sales have increased incentive to keep the rhino alive

    • effective field protection

    • monitoring has provided information for better biological management

    • efforts to integrate local communities into conservation efforts

    • there are a number of regional African rhino conservation initiatives (groups)

    • strengthening law enforcement

  • Consequences of the loss of the species (Ecological, socio-political, economic):

    • loss of economic growth and sustainable development that comes from rhinos

    • valuable plants and animals in the area which were protected due to rhinos will lose that protection

  • Rate of loss (is possible):

    • (status) near endangered

    • population increasing

      • population is currently at about 20,000