Lab Report

By: Skyler S, Reuben M, and Torri T

Reason and Research

We decided to test our heart rate with jumping jacks and lunges. Doing jumping jacks is a good way to get blood pumping fast while lunges don't bring up your heart rate as much but it still does bring up your heart rate a little.

Hypothesis, Independent Variable, Dependent Variable, Control, Constants

Hypothesis: Doing jumping jacks for 30 seconds will increase the heart rate more that doing lunges for 30 seconds. The recovery time for jumping jacks will be at least 3 minutes and the recovery time for lunges will be around 30 seconds.


Independent: Type of exercise (jumping jacks and lunges)


Dependent: Heart Rate


Control: Resting heart rate


Constants: exercises, amount of time of each exercise, heart rate taken in 30 seconds, position of body during resting heart rate

Resting Heart Rate Data Table

Person 1: Reuben

Person 2: Torri

Jumping Jacks Data Table

BPM after exercise average;

Person 1: 100.6/min

Person 2: 96.9/min

Recovery time average;

Person 1: 3 minutes 36 seconds

Person 2: 1 minute 30 seconds

Lunges Data Table

BPM after exercise average;

Person 1: 82/min

Person 2: 88.6/min

Recovery time average;

Person 1: 2 minutes 6 seconds

Person 2: 1 minute 30 seconds

Conclusion

The hypothesis stated that the "Doing jumping jacks for 30 seconds will increase the heart more than doing lunges for 30 seconds. The recovery time for jumping jacks will be at least 3 minutes while the lunges recovery time will be about 30 seconds." The evidence shows that the average BPM after jumping jacks for person 1 was 100 beats/min. The evidence also shows that the average BPM after lunges for person 1 was 82 beats/min. The average recovery time after jumping jacks for person 1 was around 3 minutes while the average recovery time for lunges for person 1 was 2 minutes. All this evidence proved that the hypothesis was correct. Jumping jacks increased the heart rate more and had a longer recovery time than lunges.

Bibliography

"Pulse Measurement." WebMD. WebMD, 03 Jan. 0000. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/pulse-measurement>.