Stress Management

Brianna Palmer

Stress

The definition of stress is the way your body responds to any kind of demand or threat.
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Some examples of stress in teens

Homework/School

  • Grades/GPA
  • Tests

Parents/Family

  • Expectations
  • To much pressure

Social Life

  • Friends
  • Relationships
  • Extracurriculars
  • Sex

Time

  • Deadlines
  • Keeping up
  • Lack of sleep
  • Too much going on

Positive Ways to Manage Stress

  • Go for a walk
  • Spend time in nature
  • Call a good friend
  • Play a competitive game of tennis or racquetball
  • Write in your journal
  • Take a long bath
  • Light scented candles
  • Savor a warm cup of coffee or tea
  • Play with a pet
  • Work in your garden

Negative Ways to Manage Stress

  • Smoking
  • Drinking to much
  • Taking drugs or pills
  • Sleeping too much
  • Procrastinating
  • Filling up every minute of the day to avoid facing problems
  • Taking out your stress on others
  • Bingeing on junk or comfort food
  • Zoning out with the computer or tv
  • Withdrawing from friends, family, and activities

Some effects of Stress

  • Headache
  • Muscle tension or pain
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
  • Anxiety
  • Restlessness
  • Lack of motivation or focus
  • Overeating or undereating
  • Angry outbursts
  • Drug or alcohol abuse

Statistics

  • 44% of Americans feel more stressed now than they did 5 years ago
  • Work stress causes 10% of the occurring strokes in America
  • Stress related ailments cost the nation around $300 billion a year in medical bills and lost productivity
  • 40% of stressed people overeat, or eat unhealthy foods

Facts on Teen Stress

  • In the UK, anywhere between 600-800 students between the ages of 15-24 commit suicide annually. A poll of 804 teachers revealed that 73% considered school extremely stressful for children.
  • A survey conducted by the Associated Press and MTV discovered that of the 85% of students claiming they experienced "stress at least sometimes” were female. 45% reported they felt it “frequently,” compared to 32% of their male colleagues.
  • For both females and males between the ages of 13-17, studies showed, school stood as their primary conduit of super stress.
  • A staggering 30% of the city’s high schoolers suffered beneath a suicide risk, and one institution in particular saw 40 teens forced to go under behavior monitoring within a year due to stress.