Ancient Rome FAQs

Caesar Farina

WRITING

Romans used Papyrus to write on. Papyrus was basically their paper, but not everybody could afford papyrus. Only wealthy and important people could afford to use the Papyrus paper. These wealthy people hired scribes to write because not everybody could read and write.Other options were carving on shallow wooden tablets covered in wax and stone tablets.

FAMILY

Family were very different from modern families. A roman family consisted of a pater familias, oldest father in the family who was in charge of everything going on in the family, a mother, a couple of children, and slaves. Children in the families were home schooled, the father would hire a private teacher to teach the children (but most children were uneducated) and most children were born at home. Slaves were present in wealthy families and they were considered a part of property. Women were treated unfairly and were considered inferior to men because men thought that they were in charge of everything. Fathers were the leaders of their own family. They made all the decisions in the family and nobody could contradict them. When a woman made a baby, the father would make the decision about whether or not to raise the baby.


Roman names were a lot different back then. If you were a gens ( all individuals born or adopted into the same family) you would have a family name. All males has at least 2 names, the nomen (family name), and prenomen ( first name). Example: Caesar's real name was Gaius Julius Caesar and Augustus' was Gaius Julius Caesar Octavianus Augustus.

Women did not have prenomens, just the family name. Gaius Julius Caesar had two daughters one named Fabia Major and one named Fabia Minor

CLOTHING - MEN'S AND BOYS'

Men and boys wore togas or tunics. The togas were a symbol of roman citizenship ans was a required dress for official activities. Men wore togas to audiences with the Emperor and to the games played in the Roman Arena. At the time of the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC) and after, only free male citizens of Rome who were at least sixteen years of age could wear a specialized toga. Roman boys wore a bulla, a neck chain and round pouch containing protective amulets ( usually phallic symbols), and the bulla of an upper-class boy would be made out of gold.

CLOTHING - WOMEN'S AND GIRLS'

Freeborn girls wore the same "costume" as the freeborn boys, a toga worn over a tunic. Women would wear a toga with a purple border; her hair would be braided, tied with wool cloth; and she would wear a necklace resembling an amulet. A roman bride wear a tunica recta that was woven on an ancient upright loom.

CITATIONS

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"The Nature of the Family." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 324-325. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Tortora, Phyllis. "Toga." Encyclopedia of Clothing and Fashion. Ed. Valerie Steele. Vol. 3. Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons, 2005. 329-331. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.