Poetry Power

Paul Revere's Part II

Introduction

Can you imagine having an alarm waking you up in 2:45 to go fight a war. This is what happened in that time. This poem is a very suspenseful, longing, and meaningful to this era. As a part of England The people refused to pay any taxes, so they declared war. This poem depicts the story of Paul Revere and how he saved America from being under British rule.


Paul Revere's Ride Part II

The poem is about the time where Paul Revere warns the civilians about the redcoats. This poem depicts the actions leading towards the war. Paul Revere is staying beneath the church to see if the signal is called. One lamp lit means the redcoats are coming by sea and if two were lit they were coming by land. This poem explain why Paul Revere is a true American hero.







This poem helps us understand the time in american history when Paul Revere sighted the British when they attacked the colonists in the middle of the night and that Paul Revere saved them by charging, on horseback, yelling, “The redcoats are coming! The redcoats are coming!”




The Dramatic Reading...

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,

In their night encampment on the hill,

Wrapped in silence so deep and still

That he could hear, like a sentinel's tread,

The watchful night-wind, as it went

Creeping along from tent to tent,

And seeming to whisper, "All is well!"

A moment only he feels the spell

Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread

Of the lonely belfry and the dead;

For suddenly all his thoughts are bent

On a shadowy something far away,

Where the river widens to meet the bay,

A line of black that bends and floats

On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.


Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,

Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride

On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.

Now he patted his horse's side,

Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,

Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,

And turned and tightened his saddle girth;

But mostly he watched with eager search

The belfry tower of the Old North Church,

As it rose above the graves on the hill,

Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.

And lo! as he looks, on the belfry's height

A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!

He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,

But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight

A second lamp in the belfry burns.


A hurry of hoofs in a village street,

The fate of a nation was riding that night;

And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,

Kindled the land into flame with its heat.

He has left the village and mounted the steep,

And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,

Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;

And under the alders that skirt its edge,

Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,

Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

It was twelve by the village clock

When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.

He heard the crowing of the cock,

And the barking of the farmer's dog,

And felt the damp of the river fog,

That rises after the sun goes down.



Teaching the class

  1. Hi I'm Meter! I'm the formal organization of the rhythm of a line into regular patterns. In this poem I'm in the begging. I'm And seeming to whisper, "All is well!" because in each section of me there are three syllables (And seeming/to whisper/"All is well!")
  2. Hi I'm Rhythm! I'm the repetition of the same ("perfect rhyme") or similar sounds, most often at the ends of lines. I'm "A line of black that bends and floats. On the rising tide like a bridge of boats." This what it's called to be "perfect rhyme"
  3. Hi I'm Narrative! I'm the report of related event present to the listeners or readers in words arranged in a logical sequence. I'm the story that the poem is telling.
  4. Hi I'm Imagery! I'm the words the author uses to put a picture in the reader’s mind. I'm On a shadowy something far away, Where the river widens to meet the bay, A line of black that bends and floats On the rising tide like a bridge of boats. This shows you a visual of the place.
  5. Hi I'm Alliteration! I'm the repetition of the same sound at the beginning of a word. I'm "A hurry of hoofs in a village street," or "turned and tightened" or "springs to the saddle"
  6. Hi I'm mood! I'm the way the reader feels when reading a story. The mood of the story is suspense and then throughout the story it gets more suspenseful. But the suspense ends at "A glimmer, and then a gleam of light" After that section it becomes daring, mysterious, alarming because he starts his horse and starts warning.
  7. Hi I'm end rhyme! I'm the rhyme occurring to replace the old pattern. I'm "Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride, Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride"
  8. Hi I'm end rhyme! I'm the repetition in literature is the repeating of a phrase, word or stanza form. In this story belfry is repeated many times.

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