Collection of Poetry for 2nd Grade!

Presented by Mindy Naya

The Search


I went to find the pot of gold
That's waiting where the rainbow ends.
I searched and searched and searched and searched
And searched and searched, and then--
There it was, deep in the grass,
Under an old and twisty bough.
It's mine, it's mine, it's mine at last...
What do I search for now?

Teaching with Where The Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein

Shel Silverstein's poems are relatable for children. They teach descriptive poetic language, creative writing, imagery, expressive voice, figurative language, different perspectives, meaning, and of course rhymes.


-"Point of View" on page 98:
Implications for Instruction: Fun and creative way to introduce points of view. This poem discusses three points of view; Turkey, A Bird, and the dinner's point of view.

Lesson Ideas: Students will write poems about seasons in a year from something prominent within that season's point of view. For example: A student may write about Spring from a flowers point of view. I would teach this toward the end of a Poetry unit so that students are already familiar with various kinds of poems, and to discuss what kind of poem would be best for this activity.

Questions to Ask- What is point of view? Whose point of view is the poem written in? Can it there be multiple points of view? What does the poem remind you of?



-"The Search":
Implications for Instruction: This poem teaches students about open ended responses, endings, and predictions of what is to come!

Lesson Ideas: Students will make up the ending of the poem based on their predictions of what is to come next! All students can share their endings during Reader's Workshop.

Questions to Ask: What do you think might happen next? What clues in the poem tell you that something is going to happen?



-"Eighteen Flavors": on page 116:
Implications for Instruction: This poem is very descriptive and teaches students how adjectives and descriptive language can be integrated into poems that children will read and write.

Lesson Ideas: Students will integrate descriptive language into their written work; such as in their original stories and poetry.

Questions to Ask: How can a writer make their work more descriptive? What kinds of words in this poem are easy to visualize? Does it make you hungry? What are adjectives?
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Common Core State Standards

"Point of View" Lessons:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.6
Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. CCR Anchor Standard: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.6
Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.10
With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.6
Identify who is telling the story at various points in a text.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.4
Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.


"Eighteen Flavors" Lessons:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.5
Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.10
With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1.
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.1.4
Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
W.K.5, W.1.5, W.2.5 With guidance and support from adults, respond to questions and suggestions from peers and add details to strengthen writing as needed.


"The Search" Lessons:
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.3.5
Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections
CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.2.4
Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

Earth Day Poetry!

Trees by Harry Behn


Trees are the kindest things I know,
They do no harm, they simply grow
And spread a shade for sleepy cows,
And gather birds among their bows.

They give us fruit in leaves above,
And wood to make our houses of,
And leaves to burn on Halloween
And in the Spring new buds of green.

They are first when day's begun
To tough the beams of morning sun,
They are the last to hold the light
When evening changes into night.

And when a moon floats on the sky
They hum a drowsy lullaby
Of sleepy children long ago...
Trees are the kindest things I know.

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Poetry Can Help you Think Creatively!!!!