Feel the Bern

Bernie Sanders's Road to the White House

Changing Candidates: WHY?

In my effort to choose a candidate to vote for in the upcoming primaries, I settled with a Republican who was doing quite well as of last September. Ben Carson interested me with his witty comments and strong ideologies but as the candidacy process continued he became more jumbled and hard to understand. I believe the major drop in his poll standings speaks true of what I believe and it seems what most other Americans believe to be true. I opened my mind to what I truly believed and not just the two party system of Republicans v. Democrats and thus I found myself siding with Bernie on many issues. So now I am restarting my Road to the White House project with a better candidate in mind.
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How's Bernie Doing? Let Find Out

Sanders wants to break up the biggest banks, double the minimum wage, and put the entire country on Medicare. And his message has been resonating. He's drawn massive crowds nearly everywhere he's traveled. In August, 28,000 people showed up to see him speak at an arena in Madison, Wisconsin. Two recent polls have put him ahead of Clinton in New Hampshire. Bernie-mentum—as the pundit class has dubbed the candidate's surging appeal—has the Clinton camp worried that Sanders defeat her in Iowa, according to the New York Times. Indeed, a September poll showed Sanders edging out Clinton by 10 points there. Sanders has built his campaigns around a theme that would sound familiar to his supporters today: American society had been hijacked by plutocrats, prudes, and imperialists, and wholesale reform was needed to restore it to its rightful course. "I have the very frightened feeling that if fundamental and radical change does not come about in the very near future, that our nation, and, in fact, our entire civilization, could soon be entering an economic dark age," he said. Sanders is now standing on the biggest platform of his political career. Win or lose, his ideas will influence the national debate as never before. In some ways they already have. In August, the Democratic National Committee adopted a $15 minimum wage as part of its official platform, bringing the senator's once-radical proposal firmly into the mainstream. Sanders always seemed to know that he'd get his chance to effect big change, even if others dismissed him as a radical or derided him as a socialist.

"Nobody who works 40 hours a week should be living in poverty."

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Bernie's Going on Trip in His Favorite Rocket Ship out to Iowa and NH

After sputtering in most polls, the breakout star of the summer has significantly narrowed the gap in national match-ups against Hillary Clinton, expanded his lead in New Hampshire and overtaken the former secretary of state in Iowa. Like Obama, Sanders has sparked a movement powered by young voters who see the septuagenarian not just as a protest candidate, but as the future of the progressive movement. And his $75 million fundraising haul guarantees his viability. After Iowa and New Hampshire -- two overwhelmingly white states -- Sanders faces an electorate that is much more diverse and not as familiar with Sanders, especially in the South, which at the moment is Clinton Country. Sanders will be featured in next month's issue of Ebony magazine and on Sunday in a debate in South Carolina sponsored by the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, he will have a chance to connect with black voters and post up against the former secretary of state on issues like criminal justice reform, education, and the economy. A national New York Times/CBS News poll shows Clinton with the support of 48% of Democratic voters, and Sanders closing in with 41%. But South Carolina, Nevada and the southern "SEC primary" states all pose electoral challenges for the senator.
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"I believe in a society where all people do well, not just a handful of billionaires"

Campaign Finance Report

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Real Change | Bernie Sanders