The Gertie Belle Rogers Quiver

Quiver /ˈkwivər/ a portable case for holding (Golden) Arrows

Can You Imagine?

Take a look at the above pictures. You can click on them to make them bigger. I found them in some old PTA yearbooks I came across over the summer.


They remind me of the iconic "Carpe Diem" scene in Dead Poets Society. If you are unfamiliar, it is easily found on YouTube.


Can you imagine gathering those in the pictures around you, setting up a Swivl, Google Meets, unloading a fleet of Chromebooks, and opening up a Google search tab; essentially a portal to all of human history? Can you imagine the gentleman in the suit (I cannot get over the intensity on his face amidst smiles from everyone else) handing you the giant microphone rig, and whatever apparatus it is attached to - along with what is apparently a hot pad - to hold the microphone and telling you to take over?


Perhaps he was recording a lesson to tape (or acetate) to send home to a child who was quarantined with a virus? Sixty years from now, will someone discover an edition of the Quiver, with a picture of elearning, and chuckle at its primitive nature?


What's next? Projecting teachers into the living room of students via hologram? Having students put on virtual reality glasses or headsets to join a fully detailed, albeit digital, classroom? Actually, we're not that far away from that being a reality...


All of the above seems a little bit silly. But take a second to appreciate how far technology has come in a relatively short time. Then take a second to appreciate that quality instruction from teachers in Mitchell has not changed. Great teachers are still great teachers, the methodology has shifted, but caring about students, loving your profession, watching and helping learners learn, these are the great commonalities across generations.

If I Had a Monster Under My Bed

17 Seconds of Joy In Its Purest Form

These seventeen seconds were captured in slo-mo so the video is a touch longer than that. If you want to get to the heart of the "joy" fast-forward to approximately the fifty-second mark!


Or, just take two minutes, relax and watch the entire thing!

Joy in Its Purest Form

Pointillism

Greatest Common Factor Gallery Walk

Here are a few pictures from an activity I came across in a classroom this week. Students were spaced around the room, examining story problems, and working together on very specific math concepts. This is a great teaching strategy and is used in a lot of classrooms. The thing that caught my eye on this particular day was, first, the depth and specifics of the sheets the students were examining and, second, the digital partnership. In the middle picture, a student is holding the classroom Swivl, maneuvering an elearner around the room to take part!

This Came Together Nicely!

This mosaic is now hanging on the back wall of our stage. It echoes the theme throughout the elementary buildings "We Are Better Together!" Each classroom had a large sheet that was cut into puzzle pieces. Then, students were able to decorate a puzzle piece and put their classroom puzzle together. Next, they brought their completed puzzle to the commons to be a part of the bigger puzzle which has a giant "GBR" in the middle and the four mainstays in our building:


* If you see something say something.

* Help others in need.

* Include others left out.

* Be kind to others.



Learners have had a lot of fun finding their own puzzle piece, their classroom piece, and admiring the work of everyone else! Please click on the pictures to zoom in!