Trees Around Timberview

By: Addison Davis and Ethan Burkholder

FOR ALL THREE TREES

Growing

First, you must dig a hole that is twice as big as the base of the tree. Make a moat of soil around the hole you have created so that less water will be lost, and the roots more protected. Then, place the tree inside and pour about 1 inch of water before covering it up with soil. Finally, maintain the tree by giving adequate sunshine, daily water dosage, fertilizing if needed, and a lot of affection.

Abiotic Necessities

Soil, sunlight, and water.

Impact on TMS Environment (Short and Long Term)

There could possibly be an increased amount of trees from fertilization. Also, sprinkler systems might be damaged from excessive root growth.

Southern Magnolia

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Vegetative Reproduction Method

Portions of lower limbs of saplings often become imbedded in the forest floor where roots develop, eventually producing seperate trees.

Dependent Organisms

Insects, birds, and mammals. These organisms feed on the magnolia flower blooms, which causes damage to the tree.

Limiting Factors

Extreme drought and summer fires cause the tree to have difficulty re-growing.

Affecting Parasites

The algal leaf spot is a parasite that first appears as a green, circular, wavy-edged speck. It eventually turns red as spores develop, affecting both the leaf and twig.

Possible Adaptations

Since the tree typically grows in fully-amounted sun or possibly partial-shade, the tree has adapted to having potentially little sunlight on days of abnormal weather. Also, the tree grows in relatively humid climates, so it has adapted well to high levels of moisture.

Live Oak

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Reproduction Method

In early spring, the male flowers grow into thin, wormlike shapes known as catkins or an ament. The flowers consist of pollen-producing stamens that release pollen into the air-- before eventually falling to the ground, once they are spent. Fallen catkins can often be seen in spring at the foot of oak trees. Fertilization occurs when the yellow mist of the airborne pollen comes to rest on a receptive stigma in the female flower, with a little help from the wind. The female flowers grow where the leaf stalks meet the branches or twigs. Fertilized flowers grow into acorns that sit in hard cups called peduncles.

Growing

Note- this tree has the same planting process as the others.

Dependent Organisms

The trees produce sweet, edible acorns that turkeys, ducks, jays, quail, deer and other animals enjoy.

Limiting Factors

Harsh weather, drought, pollution, and harsh soil.

Affecting Parasites

Oak wilt, diplodia canker, oak root rot, anthracnose, and mistletoe.

Texas Red Oak

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Reproduction Method

In early spring, the male flowers grow into thin wormlike shapes known as a catkin or an ament. The flowers consist of pollen-producing stamens that release pollen into the air before eventually falling to the ground once they are spent. Fallen catkins can often be seen in spring at the foot of oak trees. Fertilization occurs when the yellow mist of the airborne pollen comes to rest on a receptive stigma in the female flower, with a little help from the wind. The female flowers grow where the leaf stalks meet the branches or twigs. Fertilized flowers grow into acorns that sit in hard cups called peduncles.

Growing

Note- This tree has the same planting process as the other trees.

Dependent Organisms

Turkeys, ducks, jays, quail, deer, and other animals like to feed on this tree.

Limiting Factors

Harsh weather, drought, pollution, and harsh soil.

Affecting Parasites

Note- This tree has the same affecting parasites as the "Live Oak".