Bill of Rights

Felicia Nguyen -2nd Period- 12/17/14

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What are the Bill of Rights?

The Bill of Rights will look after all people of the United States no matter what your static is.

Bill 1: Freedom of speech

You can choose any religion you want to follow and say or write anything you want.


Court Case: New York Times Co. vs United States


  • Supreme Court ruled in favor of the New York Times. While the publication is an embarrassment to the government, the court believe it didn't threaten national security.

Bill 2: The Right to bare arms

You are able to protect yourself by owning guns and the government can't stop you.

Bill 3: The Rights to privacy in the home

Soldiers can not live in your home or eat your food with out to your consent or permission.

Bill 4: Unreasonable Search and Seizure

Police can not enter your house, looking for something without a search warrant, to get a warrant, to get one they need a really good reason to search your house.


Court Case: Arizona vs Evens

Bill 5: Double jeopardy, Self-incrimination, and process of law

Everyone gets a far trial for a capital crime before a grand jury can take away any of your belonging, freedom, and or life without paying for it.


Court Case: Barron vs Baltimore

Bill 6: The Right of the accused in criminal cases

If you are charged with a crime, your trial has to happen as soon as possibles and should be held in a public, also you could have a lawyer to back you up.

Bill 7: The Rights to A Jury Trial

You can only have one civil, money wise, are settled by a jury. It can not be brought up again in a another court.

Bill 8: Preventing Cruel and unusual Punishment

Any crime you commit, there can not be an unreasonable punishment laid a pond you. It must be a punishment fitting the crime.


Court Case: Robinson vs California

  • Supreme Court

Bill 9: Rights retained by the people

Just accuse we made the list does not mean these are the only rights you have.


Court Case: Gris wold vs Connecticut

Bill 10: Limiting Federal Power

The state has power as long as the Constitution doesn't say anything about it.