Missouri (MO) Population 5,988,927

"The Show-Me State" 68,886 Square Miles

Missouri State Flag

Designed by Mary Elizabeth Oliver, the red and white stripes, as is traditional, represent valor and purity, respectively. The blue represents three things: the permanency, vigilance, and justice of the state. The three colors also highlight the French influence on the state in its early years. The flag was made the official flag of the state on March 22, 1913, when then governor Elliot Woolfolk Major signed a bill making it official.

Missouri Flora and Fauna

The eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) is a small bird found in open woodlands, farmlands, and orchards. Eastern bluebirds are found east of the Rockies, southern Canada to the Gulf states, and southeastern Arizona to Nicaragua.
Big image

White Hawthorn (Crataegus Punctata) and Red Hawthorn (Crataegus Mollis)

Crataegus punctata is a species of hawthorn known by the common names dotted hawthorn or white haw that is native to most of the eastern U.S. and eastern Canada. While some sources claim it is the state flower of Missouri, the actual legislation does not identify an exact species. Furthermore, the Missouri Department of Conservation asserts the Crataegus Mollis was specifically designated as the state flower.
Big image
Big image

Flowering Dogwood (Cornus Florida)

A crystalline, white species of dogwood found all-over America, Nuevo Leon and Veracruz(Mexico) and parts of Ontario, Canada. At maturity, these trees can grow up to 30 feet tall and can sprout hundreds, even thousands of flowers.
Big image

Culture and Geography

St. Louis was an important area for jazz, bluegrass, and even country musicians alike. From the late 50s to early 60s, hillbilly music originated in the Ozark Mountains, located in southern Missouri, northern Arkansas, northeastern Oklahoma, and southeastern Kansas. These states share this 47,000 square mile, 2,700+ foot high mountain range.
Big image
Big image

Famous People from Missouri

Probably one of the most influential and significant figure from is that of George Washington Carver. Carver's work at Tuskegee University included groundbreaking research on plant biology that brought him to national prominence. Many of these early experiments focused on the development of new uses for crops such as peanuts, sweet potatoes, soybeans and pecans. The hundreds of products he invented included plastics, paints, dyes and even a kind of gasoline. In 1920, Carver delivered a speech before the Peanut Growers Association, attesting to the wide potential of peanuts. The following year, he testified before Congress in support of a tariff on imported peanuts. With the help of Carver's testimony, the proponents of the tariff were able to institute it in 1922.


Courtesy of http://www.biography.com/people/george-washington-carver-9240299#tuskegee-institute

Big image

Tourism

St. Louis- The history of St. Louis has been heavily influenced by Westward expansion and blues music. The big "must-see" in this region is the Gateway Arch, while other important sites include the Museum of Westward Expansion, the St. Louis Cathedral and the Anheuser-Busch factory tour. The city offers plenty for the whole family. Children will enjoy the local zoo and the Magic House, while family members will also want to unwind at Forest Park, home to the World's Fair almost a century ago.


Courtesy of http://www.tripadvisor.com/Tourism-g44881-Saint_Louis_Missouri-Vacations.html

Big image
Big image

Historical Importance - The Missouri Compromise

In the years leading up to the Missouri Compromise of 1820, tensions began to rise between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions within the U.S. Congress and across the country. They reached a boiling point after Missouri’s 1819 request for admission to the Union as a slave state, which threatened to upset the delicate balance between slave states and free states. To keep the peace, Congress orchestrated a two-part compromise, granting Missouri’s request but also admitting Maine as a free state. It also passed an amendment that drew an imaginary line across the former Louisiana Territory, establishing a boundary between free and slave regions that remained the law of the land until it was negated by the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.


Courtesy of http://www.history.com/topics/missouri-compromise

Big image

The Origins of Missouri

Missouri got it's start as a small colony for Paleo-Indian peoples, as such for many parts of the geographical North America, all the way back to 12,000 B.C. It stayed that way until the 17th century when New France set up colonies in the area and sold the during the Louisana Purchase circa. 1803. Missouri wasn't an actual proclaimed state during 1800's until 20 years later. Before then, it was simply considered free and unclaimed territory. that changed in 1820, when the Union and Confederacy were equally divided between free and slave states. As stated above, Missouri was in dead center and both the Union and Confederacy tried to sway the state multiple times. Eventually, it was proclaimed a slave state in August 10, 1821 as the 24th state of the albeit fragile U.S.
Big image

America's First "Smart-City" Modernizing Missouri

Kansas City has adopted several technologies that enable more efficient management of our infrastructure – from traffic signals to stormwater management. The City is continuing to expand the integration of leading edge technologies to improve our operations and improve the citizen experience with specific goals established in the KC Digital Roadmap.

In June 2015, Kansas City signed a strategic collaboration agreement with Cisco Systems, Inc. to develop the most comprehensive smart city network in North America along the streetcar starter line in Downtown. Attracted to Kansas City for its emerging technology sector, the investment in transit infrastructure, and the advent of Google Fiber, Cisco is proposing a model that will once again put our city at the forefront of innovation, technology and entrepreneurship.

Over the past year, Cisco and its partners have evaluated the needs of our city departments and our existing infrastructure to propose a unique program that will enhance Internet connectivity, enable efficiencies in management of public infrastructure, introduce new revenue streams, and ultimately improve the citizen experience in our urban core. This program will also bring new economic development by attracting technology start-ups from across the globe to test their concepts. The following outlines the two primary components of the proposed KC Smart City initiative: the Cisco Smart + Connected Community and the Living Lab.


Courtesy of http://kcmo.gov/smartcity/

Big image
Big image
Smart Governance

Interconnected within-city and across-city governance, including services and interactions that link and, where relevant, integrate public, private, civil and European Community organisations so the city can function efficiently and effectively as one organism. The main enabling tool is ICT.


Smart Economy

E-business and e-commerce, increased productivity, ICT-enabled and advanced manufacturing and delivery of services, ICT-enabled innovation, as well as new products, new services and business models. Local and global connectedness includes physical and virtual flows of goods, services and knowledge.


Smart Mobility

ICT supported and integrated transport and logistics systems. Sustainable, safe and interconnected systems for trams, buses, trains, metros, cars, bicycles and pedestrians. Prioritises clean and green options. Real-time information can be accessed by the public to improve commuting efficiency, save costs and reduce CO2 emissions.


Smart Enviroment

Smart energy including renewables, ICT-enabled energy grids, metering, pollution control and monitoring, renovation of buildings and amenities, green buildings and green urban planning. Urban services such as street lighting, waste management and water resource systems that are monitored for efficiency and to reduce pollution.


Smart People

Those with e-skills, working in ICT-enabled roles, having access to education and training, human resources and capacity management, within an inclusive society that improves creativity and fosters innovation. Enables people and communities to input, use, manipulate and personalise data to make decisions and to create products and services.


Smart Living

ICT-enabled lifestyles, behaviour and consumption. Healthy and safe living in a culturally vibrant city with diverse cultural facilities and good quality housing. Linked to high levels of social cohesion and social capital.

Works by Thomas Hart Benton of Neosho, Missouri circa. somewhere between 1900-1975. Quite possibly one of America's greatest 20th-century artists. Born April 15, 1889. Died in his studio January 19, 1975. His fluid, sculpted figures in his paintings showed everyday people in scenes of life in the United States, particularly, the Mid-west.
Big image
Portrait of Artist Thomas Hart Benton
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image
Big image
These are just a few of his timeless pieces. There are many more in the Jefferson City state capitol and the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.