Ancient Roman FAQs

Apollo Meyer

Writing

Closest equivalent to use of paper was the papyrus. In order to write on the papyrus, the romans used a quill dipped in ink to use as a pencil.

Family

The Roman family was a lot different in the way modern families work today. The Romans had slaves, which they could kill if they wanted. The father could let a new-born die or let it live if he wanted it or not. The father was in charge and in full control at all times. If the father was killed, then the person that was the oldest would be in charge.


The way Romans raised there children were different also. The father made the decision whether or not to raise the baby. At some points if the father did not want the baby, it was rejected and exposed to the elements to die. In other cases some families all together refused to raise their children.


The names of roman men and women are very different from today also. All men had at least two names. Womens names were very simple, they only had a first name from the gem.

Men's and Boy's Clothing

In Roman society men wore a loose robe or cloak called a himation, alone or over a chiton. Younger men, especially horsemen and travelers, wore a shorter cloak called a chlamys, which was pinned on one shoulder. Roman boys wore a bulla, a neckchain and round pouch containing protective amulets(usually phallic symbols), and the bulla of an upper-class boy would be made of gold.

Women's and Girl's Clothing

In Roman freeborn girls, that is, girls whose parents were not slaves, wore the same costume as free born boys; a toga worn over a tunic. A married women wore a stola, a dress held to the shoulders by straps, It hung to the feet and resembled a modern slip. Disgraced women wore a plain white toga.

Citations

"Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 8 Oct. 2015.