Sharon Creech

A Newbery Medal Winning Author

Meet Sharon Creech

Sharon Creech was born in South Euclid, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. She grew up there with her family. When Sharon was young, she wanted to be many things when she grew up. Sharon wanted to be a painter, an ice skater, a singer, a teacher, and a reporter. It soon became apparent that she had little drawing talent, very limited tolerance for falling on ice, and absolutely no ability to stay on key while singing. Sharon soon learned that she would make a terrible reporter, because when she didn’t like the facts, so she changed them. It was in college, when Sharon took literature and writing courses, that she became intrigued by storytelling. Later, she became a teacher of a high school English and writing class in foreign countries. While teaching great literature, Sharon learned so much about writing: about what makes a story interesting and about techniques of plot and characterization and point of view. Sharon then married Lyle Rigg, and together they moved to Camden, Maine. Sharon and Lyle have two grown children that Sharon receives lots of inspiration. When Sharon received the Newbery Medal, she was super surprised and is very grateful.

Sharon Creech's Writing Techniques

In all of Sharon Creech's books that I have read, she writes about broken families. In some books the child is reunited with a family. In the book Walk Two Moons the main character's mother leaves to go somewhere else without the rest of the family, On the way the bus crashes and the mom doesn’t make it. Sal misses her mom and wonders why her mom and wonders why she left.In The Wanderer Sophie’s parents die when they were out sailing, and Sophie wonders She was adopted later with Foster parents.


Meet some of Sharon Creech’s writing techniques


Sharon Creech sometimes interrupts her narrative and directly addresses her reader. She uses this to make a reader more included and active in the story. This helps her make the reader feel the characters’ feelings, because it helps the reader make connections to the feelings they have had.

· The Wanderer: “I got the fish’s head cut halfway off and I was thinking, Okay, Sophie, Okay, it won’t feel this- and then as soon as I started in on the other side, the fish started flipping and floundering.” (35)

· The Wanderer: I’m not a knucklehead doofus-you are.”

· The Great Unexpected: I would tell myself, I’m not in the story, I’m not in the story.”


Emphasis in writing is important not only to create variety helps to maintain interest, but it also to help readers easily the understand main points from the text. generally receive the most notice by readers, so that is often where you will want to make your point.

· The Great Unexpected: “I wish it had food for me as well.”

· Absolutely Normal Chaos: “Carl Ray, are you? Are you adopted? Is that what you’re trying to tell me? If that-”

· Absolutely Normal Chaos: “ Well, Gosh, Carl Ray, you’re not her First boyfriend.”

· Absolutely Normal Chaos: “Christy wiggled her shoulders and said in this thin little voice, ‘ Well you are coming, aren’t you’”


Authors may sometimes use parenthetical feelings to show the characters emotions and to keep one interested in in the text and feelings of a character.


· Absolutely Normal Chaos: Instead while Aunt Radene was off doing the grocery shopping, and Sue Ann and Sally Lynn were god knows where, I swept the front porch (without anybody asking); I mopped the kitchen floor (without anybody asking); I dusted the entire downstairs (without anybody asking); I cleaned the living room (without anybody asking); I picked some flowers from the hill and put them around the house (without anybody asking); I swept and dusted the bedroom that I share with Sue Ann, Sally Lynn and Brenda Mae (without anybody asking); and just when I was starting with the windows (without anybody asking) when Aunt Radene drove up.
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Common Themes in Creech's work

In all of Sharon Creech's books that I have read, she writes about broken families. In some books the child is reunited with a family. In the book Walk Two Moons the main character's mother leaves to go somewhere else without the rest of the family, On the way the bus crashes and the mom doesn’t make it. Sal misses her mom and wonders why her mom and wonders why she left.In The Wanderer Sophie’s parents die when they were out sailing, and Sophie wonders She was adopted later with Foster parents.


Citations

Walk Two Moons:

Creech, Sharon. Walk Two Moons. New York: HarperCollins, 1994. Print.


Absolutely normal Chaos:

Creech, Sharon. Absolutely Normal Chaos. New York: HarperCollins, 1995. Print.


The Great Unexpected:

Creech, Sharon. The Great Unexpected. New York: Joanna Cotler /HarperCollins, 2012. Print.


The Wanderer:

Creech, Sharon, and David Diaz. The Wanderer. New York: Joanna Cotler /HarperCollinsPublishers, 2000. Print.