Singers in the 1930's

The Mistreatment of Other Races in the Precivilrights era

Hundreds of Years of Racism is about to Get Better Makes Minority singers able to prosper

In the 1930's the minority races were hit worse then then the white people, but they took this opportunity to get equal rights. For example the Native Americans took advantage of the Indian reorganization Act of 1934 to strengthen tribal governments. While African Americans were making their own small communities and businesses. And all minorities voices were starting to be heard through music.

Famous musicains

In the 1930's there was a lot of famous African American musicians that overcame racism. For example one of the most famous people from this time period was Dr. Carter G. Woodson. He organized the first Negro History Week which is now Black History month

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In Kansas City, pianist Count Basie began building an all-star big band after Benny Moten, a well-known bandleader died in 1935. Basie featured Lester Young, giving rise to the saxophonist’ career as an innovator, and also bringing exposure to an aggressive and bluesy vein of jazz that filled the clubs of the Midwest. The climb of jazz made many African Americans famous, but there was still much work to be done. More than 60% of African American men were jobless while only 25% of the work force was jobless.
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Famous Latino singers

With a massive economic depression in the United States, local authorities in Southwest cities begin to deport Spanish surnamed people to Mexico as part of a “repatriation” program. It is estimated that in the years between 1930 and 1935 more than 500,000 people will be deported, many of them American citizens of Mexican descent for whom Mexico is a foreign country. The Hermanos Bañuelos record “El Deportado" in protest.
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Billie Holiday was said by some to be the most famous singles artist during the 1930's publishing many songs like "If You Were Mine" (1935), "Miss Brown to You" (1935), "No Regrets" (1936), "Let's Call a Heart a Heart" (1936), "Summertime" (1936), "A Fine Romance" (1936), "These Foolish Things" (1936), "Pennies from Heaven" (1936), "My Melancholy Baby" (1936), "Nice Work If You Can Get It" (1937), "They Can't Take That Away From Me" (1937), "My Man" (1937), "Me, Myself and I" (1937), "Mean to Me" (1937), "Easy Living" (1937), "Trav'lin' All Alone" (1937), "This Year's Kisses" (1937), "Moanin' Low" (1937), "I've Hot Love to Take Me Warm" (1937), "I Can't Get Started" (1938), "I'm Gonna Lock My Heart" (1938), "Strange Fruit" (1939), "Them There Eyes" (1939), "I Gotta Right to Sing the Blues" (1939)
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The most famous singers at the time were African American, but one famous jazz player was different he was kakasian. Benny Goodman was the most famous white singer and made many hits like "King Porter Stomp" (1935), "Body and Soul" (1935), "Ballad in Blue" (1935), "Music Hall Rag" (1935), "Blue Moon" (1935), "Japanese Sandman" (1935), "Stompin' at the Savoy" (1936), "Star Dust" (1936), "Goody Goody" (1936), "The Glory of Love" (1936), "Whispering" 91936), "Goodnight, My Love" (1936),"Good-Bye" (1936), "Sing, Sing, Sing" (1937), "China Boy" (1937), "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen" (1937), "Please Be Kind" (1938), "Flying Home" (1939), "Honeysuckle Rose" (1939), "There'll Be Some Changes Made" (1939).
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