Accent Roman FAQ's

Bellona Strunk

Writing

· They used papyrus stalk layered and weaved together as paper and a quil dipped in ink to use as a writing tool.

family

· The roman families had slaves that lived with them.

· The father of the family would automatically get custody of the children if the mother and he got divorced. It was not common that the mother have custody of the children.


· The fathers of the families had/have pretty much all of the say and power in the family.

· Some of the fathers would use the slaves for sexual satisfaction to limit the number of children in the family.

· The father chooses wither a baby of his will be raised by he and his wife or if it will be rejected and gotten rid of.

· The families had slaves that live with hem and are treated like family most of the time.

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clothing - Mens' and boys

· Men and boys dressed in an undergarment called a perizoma, a loincloth that passes between the lags and around the waist or hips.

· They wear a loose robe called a himation, alone or over a chiton which is a large rectangular piece of material folded at one once and sewed together at the edge opposite the fold to form a tube. A man’s chiton it sewed along the top with holes for his head and arms.

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Jewelry

Men were only allowed one piece of jewelry to wear, usually a ring with a wax print. Boys wore only a necklace called bulla, a little pouch containing protective amulets.

Clothing - Woman and girl's

· Freeborn girls, that is, girls whose parents were not slaves, wore the same costume as free-born boys: a toga worn over a tunic. The toga was the toga praetexta with a purple border that had to be made of wool.

· Once a girl reached puberty, she put off her toga praetexta and dedicated it to the goddess "Fortuna Virginalis"—Venus in her capacity as the guardian goddess of young maidens. This was the signal that she was now ready for marriage.

· A girl might wear a necklace of some sort which could have served the same purpose as an amulet.

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citations

1. 1; "Writing and Language." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 170-172. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

2. 2; "Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

3. 3; "Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

4. WEISS, JESSICA. "Fathering and Fatherhood." Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood: In History and Society. Ed. Paula S. Fass. Vol. 2. New York: Macmillan Reference USA, 2004. 348-353. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

5. 4; "Names, Roman System of." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 3. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 66-67. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

6. 5; "Clothing." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 148-153. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

7. 6; "Roman Clothing." Fashion, Costume, and Culture: Clothing, Headwear, Body Decorations, and Footwear Through the Ages. Ed. Sara Pendergast, et al. 2nd ed. Vol. 1: The Ancient World. Detroit: UXL, 2013. 157-174. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

8. 7; "Clothing." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 268-271. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.