Sea Otter

By Ami Kusano

Description

CLASSIFICATION: (A.T.S.)

  • marine mammal

SPECIAL BODY COVERING: (A.T.S.)

  • thick, valuable fur that keep them warm

SIZE: (N.G.)

  • height - 4ft (1.25m)
  • weight - male:65lb (30kg) female:45lb (20.5kg)

COMMUNICATION: (S.W.)

  • produce sounds and communicate vocally
  • scent marking is important for marking territorial boundries

UNUSUAL CHARACTERISTICS: (book:Otters)

  • 150,000 hairs per square cm/650,000 hiars per square inch compared to 100,000 hairs on person's whole head
  • black, roughly diamond-shaped noses
Sea otters with diamond-shaped noses. (O.L.)

Adaptation

ADAPTATIONS FOR PROTECTION: (N.G.)

  • thick, waterproof petal keep sea otters warm
  • closing both ears and nostrils to keep out water when diving
  • spend time in ocean to be safe from land predators

STRUCTURE: (book:Otters)

  • clear eyelids that serves as goggles, so sea otters can see underwater
  • whiskers to feel vibrations of prey moving in water

BEHAVIOR: (N.G.)

  • prefer to stay in water, but if there are too many sea otters in the water, they rest on land
  • neat cleaning after every meals to keep their fur in good condition
  • wrap themselves in floating kelp to avoid drifting out to sea
  • mother otters swim with baby otters

ADAPTATIONS FOR GETTING AND EATING FOOD: (N.G.)

  • use small rocks or stones to break open the shell of shellfish and crustaceans
  • while floating on their back, put food on their stomach, and use their front paws to smash the rock against the shell until it breaks
  • their front paws to smash the rock against the shell until it breaks
Adult sea otter sleeping in kelp. (W.P.)

Reasons for Endangerment

REASONS FOR ENDANGERMENT: (K.P.)

  • hunted for their thick, valuable fur and for food to near extinction in 20th century
  • oil spill
  • although they have ability to walk on land, they are capable of living exclusiveky in the ocean where many of their predators are
  • began in 1700s, fur trappers and traders killed nearly one million of them
  • entangled in fishing net and other equipments
  • killer whales
  • water pollution
  • infection disease
  • because of the act of human
Killer whale trying to eat sea otter (cartoon). (WCUPA)

Habitat

LOCATION: (Wiki.)

  • most of them live in the coast of the Pacific Ocean in North America and Asia

TERRAIN: (K.P.)

  • they are capable of living exclusively in the ocean

CLIMATE: (book: Otters)

  • in the subtropical to arctic water on the Pacific coast where it is cold

HOME: (B.H.)

  • their home is water
Place where most sea otters live. (N.G.)

Food Chain

FOOD SOURCES: (Wiki.)

  • eat clams, snails, ablones, crabs, starfish, mussels, scallops, squid, chitons, small octopuses, and a variety of other things
  • eat about 160 different types of food

WHERE DOES THE SPECIES FIND FOOD: (D.O.W.)

  • find most of their food in the sea

HERBIVORE, CARNIVORE, or OMNIVORE: (B.H.)

  • they are carnivores

PREDATOR: (N.G.)

  • the predators of sea otters are sharks, killer whales, humans, bald eagles, and more

PREY: (N.G.)

  • the preys of sea otters are clams and shell fish
Sea otters eating a crab. (N.G.)

Critical Information

CRITICAL INFORMATION: (SORAC)

- The Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Research and Conservation (SORAC) program

  • study and try to save the threatened southern sea otters since 1984
  • rescue and release stranded pups.
  • provide care for sea otters that can't return to the wild and conduct scientific research
  • study how sea otters live and die
  • every spring and fall, they count sea otters in 400 miles California coast
  • develop new technologies to study specificly about sea otters
  • use dead sea otters to research how they got sick
  • share their knowledge with other aquariums and wildlife rescue facilities
Releasing sea otter. (SORAC)

citation

Websites that I used

"Basic Facts about Sea Otters." Sea Otter. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.defenders.org/sea-otter/basic-facts>.


"Information About Endangered Sea Otters." Bright Hub. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.brighthub.com/environment/science-environmental/articles/57236 aspx>.


"OTTERS - Communication." OTTERS - Communication. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.seaworld.org/animal-info/info-books/otters/communication.htm>.


"Saving Sea Otters." At the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/sorac.aspx>.


"Sea Otter: Classification, Characteristics, Reproduction, Habitat, Behaviour, Facts of Sea Otter." Sea Otter: Classification, Characteristics, Reproduction, Habitat, Behaviour, Facts of Sea Otter. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.allthesea.com/Sea-Otter.html>.

"Sea Otter FAQs - Kids Planet." Sea Otter FAQs - Kids Planet. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.kidsplanet.org/coolstuff/otters/faq.html>.

"Sea Otter." National Geographic. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/sea-otter/>.

"Sea Otter." Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 22 May 2012. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_otter>.

Book that I used

Kruuk, H. Otters: Ecology, Behaviour, and Conservation. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2006. Print.

images that i used

Adult Sea Otter Sleeping in Kelp. Photograph. Authropometaphors. Wordpress. Web. <http://anthropometaphors.wordpress.com/2012/03/26/give-a-squee-for-sea-otte rs/>.

Cartoons. Photograph. Liquid Life Laboratory. Liquid Life Laboratory. By Frank Fish. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://darwin.wcupa.edu/~biology/fish/cartoons/index.html>.

Colla, Phillip. Sea Otter Photo. 1996. Photograph. Oceanlight.com, California. Oceanlight.com. California Photographer, 1996. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://www.oceanlight.com/spotlight.php?img=21604>.

Maplab. "Range of Sea Otter." Map. Wikipedia. Www.iucnredlist.org, 31 Mar. 2012. Web. 25 May 2012. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cypron-Range_Enhydra_lutris.svg>.

Saving Sea Otters. Photograph. Monterey Bay Aquarium, Monterey. Monterey Bay Aquarium. Web. <http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/sorac.aspx>.

Wang, Ming. Marine Species Under Threat. Photograph. National Geographic. National Geographic. Web. <http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/photos/marine-species-under-threat /#/endangered01-sea-otter_24051_600x450.jpg>.

Emma's Link