Thomas Paine

Founding Father of the United States

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Thomas Paine Bio

We all remember Paine for writing of the famous "Common Sense" which helped the "13

colonies" gain independence from Great Britain. Born February 9th, 1737 Thomas grew up to be a political activist playing an essential role in the American revolution.


  1. Born Thomas Pain, despite claims that he changed his family name on emigrating to America in 1774.
  2. His first profession was stay-making(collars) which moved him around on ships then later met his wife that led him to the tobacco industry.
  3. He became a secretary in the "Society of twelve"on the side of his tobacco business.
  4. Later that spring his tobacco company failed when he left to London
  5. Right before the "American Revolution" he was introduced to Benjamin Franklin
  6. Wrote in 1776 "Common Sense"
  7. After he was arrested for supporting the king.
  8. He released "Age of Reason" an act to end religion because of conflict.
  9. He dies later not being acknowledged in his older age.

Integrity

  1. The quality of being honest and having strong moral principles; moral uprightness


Throughout Paine's life he was challenged and defeated in his trial of honesty. For example he claimed he had inspected tobacco before it was boarded, and he was caught in the act the was fired from his job. If it weren't for that incident he wouldn't have gained character, and do something life-changing for America.

Citizenship

  1. State of being a citizen.
  2. The character of an individual viewed as a member of society.

Thomas Pain for one is a "Founding Father", so he's definitely considered a citizen of America. Not all of society agreed with his views on religion, but conflict was common upon all the Americans. According to the time period even though Paine immigrant late citizen papers weren't appointed yet.

Making History: Thomas Paine

In Closing

Thomas Paine played a huge role in our freedom from the Great Britain even-though many all agree with him politically or religiously.


By: McKean Hill & Dorian Rass