Milestones

Development in Early Childhood

AGE TWO

Physical:
  • balances improves; walks more rhythmically
  • zip and unzip large zippers
  • pushes riding toys with feet
  • put on and remove simple items of clothing



Cognitive:

  • make-believe play
  • recognition memory is well-developed
  • starts to count



Language:

  • vocabulary increases
  • speaks in simple sentences
  • displays effective conversational skills


Emotional/Social:

  • understands consequences
  • develops self-esteem
  • gender-stereotyped belief increases


AGE THREE TO FOUR

Physical:
  • walk up stairs
  • throws and catches with slight involvement of upper body
  • fastens and unfastens large buttons
  • uses scissors
  • copies vertical line and circle


Cognitive:

  • grasps conversations
  • counts correctly
  • planning improves
  • sorts familiar objects into organized categories


Language:

  • adjusts speech to fit the age of listeners
  • overextends grammatical rules to exceptions
  • coins new words based on known words


Emotional/Social:

  • experiences self-conscious emotions
  • relies more on language
  • forms friendships
  • engages in parallel play



AGE FIVE TO SIX

Physical:
  • increases running speed
  • displays mature throwing and catching patterns
  • ties shoes
  • copies some numbers and simple words


Cognitive:

  • magical beliefs decline
  • understands false belief
  • attention and planning continue to improve


Language:

  • understand letters and sounds are linked
  • uses inverted spelling
  • knows about ten thousand words


Emotional/Social:,

  • emotional understanding improves
  • understands gender constancy
  • has acquired morally relevant rules
  • empathetic responding increases



Successful Language Development Strategies in the Early Childhood Classroom

References

Berk, Laura E. "Early Childhood: Two to Six Years." Development through the Lifespan. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2010. 215+. Print


Sieneke M. Goorhuis-Brouwer, et al. "The Ordering Of Milestones In Language Development For Children From 1 To 6 Years Of Age." Journal Of Speech, Language, And Hearing Research 49.5 (2006): 923-940. PsycINFO. Web. 21 July 2013.