The Black Death

By: Katie, Wilson

The Black Death : Bubonic Plague

In the early 1330's an outbreak of deadly bubonic plague occurred in china. The bubonic plague mainly affects rodents, but fleas can transmit the disease to people. Once people are infected, they infect others very rapidly. Plague causes fever and a painful swelling of the lymph glands called buboes, which is how it gets its name. The disease also causes spots on the skin that are red at first and then turn black.

Important information

The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people and peaking in Europe in the years 1346–53. Although there were several competing theories as to the etiology of the Black Death, analysis of DNA from victims in northern and southern Europe published in 2010 and 2011 indicates that the pathegon responsible was the Yersinia pestis bacterium, probably causing several forms of plague. The Black Death had a devastating impact on local communities, and the class of survivors created a country of higher wages and peasants with a determined sense of their own worth.

Social Effects

The Plague had large scale social and economic effects. People abandoned their families and friends, fled cities and shut themselves off from the world. Consequences of the Black Death included a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1347 and 1350 with 30–95 percent of the entire population killed. It reduced world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in the 14th century. It took 150 and in some areas more than 250 years for Europe's population to recover.