Biosphere

By: Ava Stipe

What Is The Biosphere?

The biosphere is the layer of the planet Earth where life exists. This layer ranges from heights of up to ten kilometres above sea level, used by some birds in flight, to depths of the ocean such as the Puerto Rico trench, at more than 8 kilometres deep. These are the extremes; however, in general the layer of the Earth containing life is thin: the upper atmosphere has little oxygen and very low temperatures, while ocean depths greater than 1000 m are dark and cold. In fact, it has been said that the biosphere is like the peel in relation to the size of an apple.


About the Biosphere.....

The biosphere is unique. So far there has been no existence of life elsewhere in the universe. Life on Earth depends on the sun. Energy, provided as sun light, is captured by plants, some bacteria and protists, in the marvellous phenomenon of photosynthesis. The captured energy transforms carbon dioxide into organic compounds such as sugars and produces oxygen. The vast majority of species of animals, fungi, parasitic plants and many bacteria depend directly or indirectly on photosynthesis.

Why is the Biosphere important?

The biosphere is as important as life itself because it is all of life. Without thebiosphere, the Earth would be a lifeless planet such as Mars or Venus.

How does the Biosphere Interacts with the other layers?

The Earth's four spheres interact in all six possible combinations: lithosphere and hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere, lithosphere and atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere, and biosphere and atmosphere. This can go in both directions. A classic example of an interaction between spheres is when a plant (part of the biosphere), takes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and water (the hydrosphere) through its roots from underground (geosphere) to perform photosynthesis, which provides the plant with food and releases oxygen into the atmosphere.

Another example is when volcanoes (lithosphere) erupt. Dust and ash particles (lithosphere) spread through much of the atmosphere and block sunlight. Less sunshine can cause a cooler, drier climate in parts of the world. Cooler climate affects the biosphere by shortening the growing season.

Yet another example is soil erosion, which occurs when rain (hydrosphere) falls on land (geosphere) denuded of vegetation (biosphere) by fire or clear-cutting. Streams and rivers (hydrosphere) become muddy or murky from erosion.

Another example would be...

Plants (biosphere) draw water (hydrosphere) and nutrients

from the soil (geosphere) and release water vapor into the

atmosphere. Humans (biosphere) use farm machinery

(manufactured from geosphere materials) to plow the

fields, and the atmosphere brings precipitation

(hydrosphere) to water the plants. Energy from the sun is

stored by plants (biosphere). When humans or animals

(biosphere) eat the plants, they acquire the energy

originally captured by the plants. Humans expend some of

this energy arranging bricks and wood (geosphere and

biosphere) into buildings. Plants (biosphere) draw water (hydrosphere) and nutrients

from the soil (geosphere) and release water vapor into the

atmosphere. Humans (biosphere) use farm machinery

(manufactured from geosphere materials) to plow the

fields, and the atmosphere brings precipitation

(hydrosphere) to water the plants. Energy from the sun is

stored by plants (biosphere). When humans or animals

(biosphere) eat the plants, they acquire the energy

originally captured by the plants. Humans expend some of

this energy arranging bricks and wood (geosphere and

biosphere) into buildings.

Everything that keeps us alive depends on the spheres interactions !!!!!

Max Anderson 39

Kahoot Trap Remix by Max Anderson 39