Irony

Pride and Prejudice

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What is Irony?

Irony is the use of words to convey a meaning that is opposite of its actual meaning.

Verbal Irony

Verbal Irony is where one person says or writes one thing and means another. The character or any person uses words to convey a meaning that is opposite of the literal meaning. Simply, this is when one character writes something, but another character interprets it another way.

Dramatic Irony

Dramatic Irony is when the audience knows something that surpasses the characters. The audience can see events that happen, thoughts of characters, and other things that other characters aren't aware of. The reader simply knows something the characters within the novel do not.


Situational Irony

Situational irony is a situation in which actions have an effect that is opposite than intended.This means that depending on what is going on in the book could change the outcome of the characters actions.

Sarcasm

Sarcasm is the use of irony to mock or convey contempt.

Examples from the Book

Verbal Irony

An example of verbal irony is when Mr. Darcy writes to his sister and Miss Bingley says to write how much she misses her. She really just wants to please Darcy’s sister, to get her to marry her brother. Another example is in the first page of the book where it states a wealthy single man is also in need of a wife, when truthfully, it is the woman that needs a wealthy man to survive in this Era.

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Dramatic Irony

An example of dramatic irony is when Mr. Collins told Mrs. Bennet that he wants to marry one of the daughters. Mrs. Bennet says Elizabeth would be a good match, but Elizabeth didn’t know this. When Elizabeth starts to feel disapproval after reading Darcy's letter. When Darcy proposes to her, she lays out many accusations about how he treats her sister and Wickham, she concludes that he is a prideful and detestable man.

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Situational Irony

An example of situational irony is when Jane stayed over the Bingley’s house and they were meant to get married, but Mr. Bingley moved on and left Jane. Another example is when Lady Catherine de Bourgh tells Elizabeth not to marry Darcy. She intends in this situation to ruin the relationship, but Elizabeth goes against Lady Catherine and marries Darcy.

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Sarcasm

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”(Austen 5).This represents sarcasm because it is a man talking about how single men with money, must want a wife. If he was speaking naturally, men with money would not be in need of a spouse.

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