American Revolution

By: Brianna Curry

Boston Tea Party

The Boston Tea Party occurred on December 16, 1773. The American colonist believed that the British was unfairly taxing them to pay for their debt. This debt occurred during the French and Indian War. This caused the colonist to be angry and it led to tension between the colonies and Britain. Patriots dumped British tea in the Boston Harbor to protest unfair taxes.
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First Continental Congress

On September 5 through October 26, twelve of thirteen colonies met at a meeting called the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia. The purpose of the meeting was to establish the rights of the colonies. During this meeting, Congress elected a Declaration of American Rights. In 1774, the Continental Association was formed which forced a boycott of all imported British goods. Delegates from each colony except Georgia gather to respond to British actions. This committee required the colonists to sign a sworn statement to join the boycotts that were against the British.
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Boston Massacre

The Boston Massacre took place on March 5, 1770. It was a street fight between a "Patriot" mob and British troops. During this fight, the British army ends up killing five colonist. This caused people to turn on the British troops. They were not welcome in the city of Boston. About 50 Boston citizens then attacked British sentinel.The Boston Massacre led to the Revolutionary War.
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Lexington and Concord

Lexington and Concord was the first battle of the American Revolution. On April 14, 1775, the British army received orders to stop the open rebellion in Massachusetts. The Boston Committee of Safety sent Paul Revere on a route to warn the rebels. The Minutemen in Massachusetts fought a brief skirmish with the British troops at Lexington and Concord. After the skirmish, a British general reported that the Americans had earned their respect.
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Proclamation of 1763

England took several actions that angered the American colonies. This dispute led to the American Revolution. The Proclamation of 1763 prohibited the settlement west of the Appalachian Mountains. This act drew an imaginary line the between the Appalachian Mountains from Canada to the North of Georgia in the South. This was a region that was costly for the British to protect.
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Battle of Yorktown

The Battle of Yorktown began on September 28, 1781. General George Washington commanded his troops to battle with the British commander Charles Cornwallis. After nearly a month of fighting General Cornwallis surrendered to the Americans. The British army was greatly outnumbered by the American and French armies. Cornwallis surrendered to Washington on October 17, 1781, ending the War for Independence.
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John Locke

John Locke was an Enlightenment philosopher whose ideas influenced the American belief in self-government. He wrote that all people are free, equal, and "natural rights" of life, liberty, and property that rulers cannot take away. He came with the social contract theory. It stated that if the government does not protect natural rights, you can overthrow it. Locke's ideas challenged the centuries-old practice throughout the world of dictatorial rule by kings, emperors, and tribal chieftains.
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Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine was an English immigrant to America. He produced a pamphlet known as Common Sense. This pamphlet inspired people to fight for independence from Great Britain. It challenged the rule of the American colonies by the King of England. Paine traveled with the Continental Army and produced the American Crisis. This pamphlet help inspire the Army.
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