Vote Cytoskeleton

Saving Lives One Cell At A Time

Big image

The Ultimate Infrastructure


  • Composed of a network of fibers throughout the cell's cytoplasm
  • Fibers: Microtubules, microfilaments, and intermediate filaments all rods spread out in the cell like the human skeleton inside YOUR body! (Bailey, 2013)



What We Do BEST (Function)

  • the "infrastructure" of a eukaryotic cell
  • helps the cell maintain its shape and gives support to the cell
  • A variety of cell organelles are held in place by it
  • Fibers in the structure work as "routes" along which other organelles can move
  • Fibers (solid rods) active in muscle contraction
  • BOTH a skeleton AND a muscle responsible for cell movement, cytokinesis, and organizations of organelles in a cell (Bailey, 2013)


Can't Live Without Us (The Most Important)

  • Without structure, there IS NO CELL
  • Organelles will wander off and therefore can't function
  • No cytoskeleton = cell death and that's bad because "Dying cells impact the organism through their interactions with living cells. . . that affect the immune system and consequences of this interaction in nonimmune tissues, such as occurs in cancer" (Green, 2011)


Don't believe us? These experts do.

References

AccessScience | Research Update | Ribosome biogenesis and disease. (n.d.). AccessScience | Research Update | Ribosome biogenesis and disease. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://www.accessscience.com/abstract.aspx?id=YB120221&referURL=/content/Ribosome-biogenesis-and-disease/YB120221

Alberts, B. (n.d.). Molecular Biology of the Cell. NCBI. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK26873/

Bailey, R. (n.d.). The Cytoskeleton. About.com Biology. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://biology.about.com/od/cellanatomy/a/aa013108a.htm

Cytoskeleton Tutorial. (n.d.). Cytoskeleton Tutorial. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/tutorials/cytoskeleton/main.html

Fannjiang, Y. (n.d.). Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Mitochondrial fission proteins regulate programmed cell death in yeast. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://genesdev.cshlp.org/content/18/22/2785.full?sid=2ccbb220-5819-4b95-85b1-498c3e2b6889

Green, D. (2011, October 28). Immunity Forum. The End and After: How Dying Cells Impact the Living Organism. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://ac.els-cdn.com/S1074761311004079/1-s2.0-S1074761311004079-main.pdf?_tid=a1df1de4-481d-11e3-9762-00000aab0f6b&acdnat=1383877965_b01e93beeff7c98dfc28cd20f880ef14

Membranes. (n.d.). Membranes. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://cronodon.com/BioTech/Membranes.html

Pomposello, S. (2010, April 20). Cell Membrane Diseases | eHow. eHow. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://www.ehow.com/list_6368550_cell-membrane-diseases.html

Saneto, R. (n.d.). Functions of mitochondria | epilepsy.com. Functions of mitochondria | epilepsy.com. Retrieved November 7, 2013, from http://www.epilepsy.com/epilepsy/mitochondrial_functions



APA formatting by BibMe.org.