Piney Woods Ecoregion (NE Texas)

By: Everett Cunningham

Dec. 7, 2014 - 6th period - Mrs. Seel

Piney Woods Ecoregion

The Piney Woods is a piney forest ecoregion in the Southern United States covering 54,400 square miles of East Texas, southern Arkansas, western Louisiana, and southeastern Oklahoma.

State Parks

The Texas portion of the Piney Woods has at least 17 state parks. Some of which are Huntsville State Park, Caddo Lake State Park and Village Creek State Park.

National Forests/Preserves

There are five National Forests/Preserves found in the Piney Woods of East Texas, covering some 634,912 acres in twelve counties. They are: Big Thicket National Preserve, Angelina National Forest, Sabine National Forest, Davy Crockett National Forest and Sam Houston National Forest.

Historical Places

You can see historical houses and buildings in the Piney Woods ecoregion. Some examples are: Belle-Jim Hotel in Jasper, Texas; Caddo Mounds State Historic Site; Governor Hogg Shrine Historic Site; Jim Hogg Historic Site; and Starr Family State Historic Site.

Lakes/bodies of water

There are at least 32 different lakes and bodies of water in the Piney Woods region. Some of which are: Lake Livingston, Nacogdoches Lake and Lake Tyler

Outdoor Activities

Some outdoor activities that you can do in the Piney Woods Ecoregion are: zip lining, fishing, boating, camping, hiking, scuba diving and swimming and more at the 32+ lakes.

Sightseeing

Explore the oil boom days with museums and a variety of attractions marking the state’s impact on the industry, the evolution of the state’s economy and America’s growth. You can also visit wineries, zoo/animal safaris, museums, airships, tour Indian reservations, or just enjoy the huge variety of trees and animals that exist in the Piney Woods. The Piney Woods is also a noted area for Bigfoot (Sasquatch) sightings, with many legends dating back to pre-European settlement.

Historic Information

The Piney Woods is a piney forest ecoregion in the Southern United States covering 54,400 square miles of East Texas, southern Arkansas, western Louisiana, and southeastern Oklahoma. These coniferous forests are dominated by several species of pine as well as hardwoods including hickory and oak. Historically the most dense part of this forest region was the Big Thicket though the lumber industry dramatically reduced the forest concentration in this area and throughout the Piney Woods during the 19th and 20th centuries. The World Wide Fund for Nature considers the Piney Woods to be one of the critically endangered ecoregions of the United States. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines most of this ecoregion as the South Central Plains.