Scientific Questionnaire

By: Aniruth Kasthuri and Swathi Deivamani(5th Pd., AP Bio)

Question

Do male juniors or male sophomores who play sports and take 2-5 AP Courses get more sleep on a weekday during the school year?
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Hypothesis

If comparing the amount of sleep male sophomores and male juniors who take 2-5 AP Courses and play sports, then male sophomores would sleep longer than male juniors on a weekday during the school year.
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Type of Investigation

This is a comparative investigation.

Parts of the Experiment

Dependent Variable - # of hours of sleep


Independent Variable - Grade


Control - None


Experimental Group - Male Juniors who Play Sports and Take 2-5 AP Courses

Male Sophomores who Play Sports and Take 2-5 AP Courses


Two Factors Held Constant

The number of AP Courses taken among the test subjects were held constant. All of them were required to take 2-5 AP Courses this school year to participate in the experiment.

Data

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Graphs

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Analysis

Male sophomores who take 2-5 AP Courses and play a sport receive more sleep on average on a school day than male juniors who take 2-5 AP Courses and play a sport. The mean average of the number of hours of sleep a sophomore receives on an average school day is 5.0909. The mean average of the number of hours of sleep a junior receives on an average school day is 6.3846. When calculating the t-test, the p-value is 0.00521. If a p-value is less than 0.05, then the independent variable had an effect. In this experiment, since the p-value of 0.00521 is less than 0.05, the independent variable, the grade of the student, had a significant effect. This can also be justified by the error bars of 2 SEM in the graph of "Mean Number of Hours Slept by 10th and 11th Graders on an Average School Day". The errors bars barely overlap signifying a significant effect of the independent variable. According to the NIH, the National Institute of Health, much of the sleep depravation has been associated with high school homework and the students' schedule. Trends have shown that juniors typically take harder and more rigorous courses compared to sophomores resulting in less sleep on an average school day. Yet, this trend was not consistent with the data from the experiment due to the intensity of the class itself. There are AP Classes that are not as high on work load as others. For example, AP Chemistry is a work-intensive course, whereas AP Statistics is a more relaxed and laid back course. This means that a student could be taking 3 laid back AP Courses his or her junior year resulting in more hours of sleep, whereas a sophomore could be taking 2 work-intensive AP Courses resulting in less hours of sleep on an average school night.
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Conclusion

The hypothesis of the experiment was incorrect. Male sophomores who take 2-5 AP Courses and play a sport sleep longer than male juniors who take 2-5 AP Courses and play a sport.
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Sources of Error/Inaccuracies

A source of inaccuracy in this experiment was the number of extracurricular activities taken by the subjects of the experiment. Juniors, for example, may not take as much extracurricular activities, whereas some sophomores take many extracurricular activities. That is why in the data, there was a sophomore who sleeps an average of 3.5 hours per night. Another source of inaccuracy was the need of each subjects regular school night. There are nights where the subjects have more than 3-4 tests or quizzes in his or her classes or they might be scrambling to finish a project. These are all factors to minimizing the number of hours of sleep the subjects received and when they are factored into the average nights, it causes irregular data.

Bibliography

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Martin, Jennifer. Writing a CER Analysis. September 2015


Ming, Xue et al. “Sleep Insufficiency, Sleep Health Problems and Performance in High School Students.” Clinical Medicine Insights. Circulatory, Respiratory and Pulmonary Medicine 5 (2011): 71–79. PMC. Web. 8 Sept. 2015.


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N.d. Battle over High School Sports Looms in Legislature. Web. 7 Sept. 2015.


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