JFK Assassination

Keaton Shugars

Who? What? When? Where? Why?

November 22, 1963, one of the most dark days in American history. A day that the nation would be shaken to its core. In Dallas Texas the president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, is shot and killed while rallying support for his re-election campaign. The investigation told us that Lee Harvey Oswald assassinated the president, however many conspiracies have aroused through out the years on if it was really Oswald, or if other people or agencies were involved.
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Theories

There are many theories about the assassination of JFK, ranging from the CIA to the vice president, Lyndon Johnson. The most popular and famous theory however is the 'Magic Bullet Theory'.
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The 'Magic Bullet Theroy'

The theory was proposed by the Warren Committee, who was investigating the assassination of the president. They came up with a theory to explain how it was possible to kill the president and hit the governor in the manner in which it happened. The theory they came up with is called 'The single bullet theory', often called the magic bullet theory. The committee proposed in this theory that Lee Harvey Oswald, shot one bullet at the president. The diagram, shown below, shows the bullets trajectory and the path in which the 'magic bullet' took.
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CIA cover up

At the begging of Kennedy's presidency, he was faced with many hard challenges that faced the whole nation. The Cold War raised tensions between superpower nations of the United States and the USSR. There was also Fidel Castro in Cuba, who posed a major security threat to the United States. In private Kennedy placed blame on the CIA, and their actions under he Eisenhower administration. Many anti-Castro advocates and CIA members viewed Kennedy as being too soft with the embargo on Cuba. This creates a theory that the CIA had a role in the assassination.
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My Edited Video

Citations

www.livescience.com/41369-single-bullet-theory-jfk-assassination.html


www.cnn.com/.../jfk-assassination-conspiracy-theories-debunked/