The Adventure In Texas With George

8 Cities. Here is my account of my road-trip across Texas.

Day One : El Paso

Mission Trail

In El Paso, my day starts by going on a historical and cultural park. Mission Trail. The park consists mostly of canyons and hills, recreation areas, and many beautiful flowers. It is the seventh-largest open space park in the United States. The park has over forty miles of hiking and mountain biking trails. Another popular spot within the park is Lake Murray. Special annual events at Mission Trails include the Amateur Photo Contest. The highest point is 1,592-foot-high Cowlles Mountain in the park. A significant portion of the park was burned by the Cedar Fire in 2003. As is typical of a chaparral ecology, within a few years the park had recovered and exhibited little evidence of recent fire damage.
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Chamizal National Memorial

Next, I went to the memorial park, Chamizal National Memorial. The park serves as a cultural center and contains art galleries, a theater, and an amphitheater. A museum, which details the history of the U.S.–Mexico border. The park honors the peaceful resolution of the Chamizal Dispute, a more than 100-year border dispute between the United States and Mexico that resulted from the natural change of course of the Rio Grande between the cities of El Paso and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua.
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Day Two : Odessa

Odessa Meteor Crater

The next day, I woke up and I am in Odessa! It is hot! So, I am going to the Odessa Meteor Crater! The Odessa Meteor Crater is a meteorite crater in the southwestern part of Ector Country, southwest of the city of Odessa of West Texas, United States. It is accessible approximately 3 miles south of Interstate 20 at Exit 108. This is one of three impact crater sites found in Texas, the others being the older and much larger Sierra Madera Crater and the Marquez Crater. The Handbook of Texas Online describes the Odessa meteor crater as the largest of several smaller craters in the immediate area that were formed by the impact of thousands of octahedrites that fell in prehistoric times. People identifies five craters at the Odessa site and shows a distribution map of the meteorite fragments recovered from the area. The recoveries have generally come from an area to the north and northwest of the main crater site, with only a few found to the south. They indicate that the structure of the main crater, because it was one of the earliest to be recognized and studied, is now used to name similar impact sites on a worldwide basis. Over 1500 meteorites have been recovered from the surrounding area over the years, the largest of which weighed approximately 300 pounds.
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The Henderson House

The Henderson House was built in 1916 at Grants and Pearls Streets by pioneer drug store owner and postmaster W. T. Henderson, Sr. (1886 - 1960) and his wife, Burmah Adele Lambert (1887- 1964). In 1925 the house was moved to 915 North Alleghaney in the first neighborhood developed north of the original Odessa town site. Built of salvaged lumber, the two bedroom frame house shows American Bungalow style. In the picture below, you can read more about The Henderson House!
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Monahans Sandhills State Park

Monahans Sand hills State Park is noted for the presence of sand dunes up to 70 feet high. Although desert-like, the Monahans Sandhills are not a desert; they are a part of a semi-arid ecosystem. Much of the Monahans Sandhills are privately owned property. The state of Texas is operating a 99-year lease with the Sealy-Smith Foundation for the ranch on which most of the land of the state park is located; the park opened to the public in 1957, and the state park has leasehold rights to this land of the sand hills until 2056. Pretty long time! The Monahans Sandhills are part of the Permian Basin of hydrocarbon formations, and some oil production continues in and around the state park. And by the way, the picture below are sand hills but they are not covering the entire Monahans Sandhills! Because that would be not a pretty good sandhill state park! More than 400 years ago, Spanish explorers were the first Europeans to report the vast hills of sand. Man was present in this area as far back as 12,000 years ago. Later, various Indian tribes used the area for temporary campgrounds and a meeting place, finding game, abundant fresh water beneath the sands, acorns, and mesquite beans available for grinding into paste with their stone tools. The area remained a favorable environment for Indians until the 1880s, when the Texas and Pacific Railroad selected Monahans as a water stop between the Pecos River and the town of Big Spring. In the late 1920s, oil production began in the area, now commonly known as the Permian Basin, and today Monahans is a marketing center for more than 800 square miles of oil and cattle country.
Monahans Sandhills State Park, Texas [Official]

Day Three : Lubbock

Lubbock Lake Landmark

So, The third day! I can't wait. So, now I am here, at Lubbock Lake Landmark! Lubbock Lake Landmark, also known as Lubbock Lake Site, is an important archaeological site, natural, cultural, and historical preserve in the city of Lubbock, Texas. The preserve is 336 acres and is a protected state landmark. There is evidence of ancient people and extinct animals at the landmark. The park active archaeological digs, too! It is located in the Yellow House Draw also known as "Punta de Agua", a tributary of the Brazos River, near ancient springs. People on the Llano Esacado used the water resources in the draw until those resources went dry in the early 1930s. In 1936, the City of Lubbock tried to make an effort to make it a usable water supply, but it did not work out. The first explorations of the site were conducted in 1939 by the West Texas Museum, now the Museum of Texas Tech University . In 1936, Clark Kimmel and Turner Kimmel found projectile points from the Firemen's Reservoir. In the late 1940s, several Folsom Period (10,800-10,300 years ago) bison kills were discovered. At one location of an ancient bison kill from a then unidentified Paleo-Indian group, broken bison bones produced the first ever radiocarbon date. Material from the Clovis Period has been found on a gravel bar of the once active stream in the ancient river valley. Expositions have uncovered the remains of several extinct animals: mammoth, two types of horse, camel, ancient bison, giant short-faced bear, and giant pampathere (armadillo-like animal). This material has been recovered from an area where secondary butchering of parts of carcasses took place and mammoth bones were broken to secure pieces to use or make into tools. Folsom and later Paleo-Indian peoples hunted and killed ancient bison around the ponds and marshes in the draw. Locations where bison were both killed and butchered are called kill/butchering locales. Hunters were known to disguise themselves as wolves, and slowly creep up on the bison before springing up and attacking.
Lubbock Lake Landmark

Day Four : Plainview

Plainview Chinese Cultural Center

The Plainview Chinese Cultural Center (PCCC) is a non-profit organization started in 2005 to offer bilingual Chinese language and cultural programs for children and adults. The language programs are unlike any other Chinese program as they are based upon a bilingual format where instruction and materials are provided in both Chinese and English. The programs are designed for non-Chinese speaking or English language dominant families and does not require any prior knowledge of Chinese. The goals of these programs are reading comprehension and conversational Chinese by making the language more accessible. There are multiple levels for children ages five through eighteen and two levels for adults. The cultural programs encourage appreciation of Chinese culture by exposing participants to various Chinese holidays and festivals and the traditions involved in those celebrations. They also offer geography, sports, music, calligraphy, origami, dance, drama, martial arts, and arts and crafts. The quality of the programs is a priority of PCCC's Board of Directors and executive and administrative staff. All of the instructors are highly qualified and are required to participate in regular on site training each year. The Board and staff have tried to foster a fun environment while emphasizing quality. The success of PCCC's vision is based upon the involvement and dedication of everyone involved in the program, parents, children, staff, administration, and the Board, working as a team and communicating with one another. PCCC is also a member of the Association of Chinese Schools (ACS) and the National Chinese Association of Chinese Language Schools (NCACLS) and participates in ACS' annual conference.

Plainview Historical Cotton Center

Until the late 19th century the Comanche tribe of Native-Americans occupied the area. In 1907, with the coming of a branch of the Santa Fe Railroad, a number of farming operations were established. Cotton Center was originally created in 1925 as a consolidated school district, with a small community site, containing the school, cotton gins and various businesses to support the surrounding farms. In 1935 a local post office opened, and the first irrigation well was drilled. By the late 1940s irrigation wells proliferated, pumping water from the Ogalla Aqufiler. The community revolves around farming and is tied together by the school, which as of 2005 had 140 students in pre-kindergarten through grade 12. Cotton Center has remained stable population wise for the past 10 years.

Baker Cave National Park

Baker Cave is a prehistoric natural site located on a small canyon near a river in Southwest Texas. Baker Cave is a part of rock shelters in the Lower Pecos Canyons region and is 120 feet long by 56 feet deep. The site was perched well above the flood, saving the materials that the ancient peoples had left behind. I think it was interesting! A large cooking thing was found inside it, and containing small animals such as snakes, rats, fish, and rabbits, and a wide variety of seeds and nuts, indicating a not so well diet. Disgusting! he site was named after the Baker family, who owned the land and allowed archaeological research in the shelter. The Baker family had protected the site from looters, as did its isolated location. The first fieldwork began in April 1962, by archaeologists from the UTA's Archaeology Research Lab, who designated a shelter. During the excavations at Baker Cave, many features were found, including hearths. Most of the hearths were round and bowl-shaped.

Day Five : Wichita Falls

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Day Six : Glen Rose

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Day Seven : Houston

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Day Eight :

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