Paper Towns

By John Green Presented by Bella Lambrecht

Point of View

The novel Paper Towns is written in first person point of view.

Example: "I started the car and pulled out of the parking lot, but all her teamwork stuff aside, I still felt like I was getting badgered into something l, and wanted the last word."

You know this is first person because Quentin uses "I" and talked of things surrounding himself. In other parts of the book when people say "Quentin" the narrator answers, so you know Quentin is the narrator.

Dialogue

"I really don't want to get in trouble," I told Margo back in the minivan as she used the bottled water to wipe the black paint off her face with the tissues. She'd only needed the makeup, apparently, to get out of the house. "In my admission letter from Duke it actually explicitly says that they won't take me if I get arrested."

"You're a very anxious person, Q."

"Let's just please not get in trouble," I said. "I mean, I want to have fun and everything, but not at the expense of, like, my future."

She looked up at me, her face mostly revealed now, and she smiled just the littlest bit. "It amazes me that you can find all that **** even remotely interesting."

"Huh?"

"College: getting in or not getting in. Trouble: getting in or not getting in. School: getting A's or getting D's. Career: having or not having. House: big or small, owning or renting. Money: having or not having It's all so boring."

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This dialogue lets you see Margo's true, unfiltered character. It allows characterization to be built, as well as developing the story. Without the use of this dialogue between the 7-eleven and Wal-Mart stops, the story may become dull or a bit wordy. The dialogue breaks up the plot for an exchange between Quentin and Margo, through which Q learns about Margo's character just as much as the reader. You also learn about Q, and his concern for his future and expectation. Furthermore, the dialogue simply cannot be skipped over in this novel, or you risk not truly falling in love with Margo and Quentin.

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