Petruchio

A loud, boisterous,quick-witted gentleman from Verona.

Hunter for a wife

Petruchio comes to Padua to find a wife and finds a perfect fit, Kate. Kate was shrewishness women. Petuchio was warned about this but he hoped to silence her tongue and temper with his own. Though he declares his object is only to wive wealthily, and Grumio says he'd marry any foul old hag with money, He ridicules her in such a pleasant, madcap fashion, that one can't help liking him.


Love is a game

Pretuchio makes Kate beg for Grumio; will give no choleric food to choleric folk; in fact he "kills her in her own humour"; tames her by pretended love; starves her till she thanks him for meat he's dressed; and then when her food has made her saucy, and she rebels again about her dress (which was indeed enough to make the most angelic woman's temper rise), he beats her in the old way by pretending to sympathize with her. Then he stops her going home, because she won't say two is seven.

When she gives in, he no doubt tries her too hardly, but then she has tried him before, and the result is that they two alone are married, while the other two, Hortensio and Lucentio, are only "sped." ("Let us hope though," says Miss Constance O'Brien, "that Petruchio gave up choosing Kate's dresses and caps.") If Petruchio is not a gentleman, and Kate not a lady, their day differed from ours: they were a happy couple, we may be sure. Kate would obey him with a will, for her husband had fairly beaten her at her own game, and won her respect.