John Jay

Tiara Clark

Introduction “The people who own the country ought to govern it”-John Jay

John Jay was born in New York, NY on December 12, 1745, "he was born to Peter and Mary Jay. "He grew up in a wealthy slave owning family, John Jay had ten siblings but only 7 of them survived to adulthood." "John Jay was the sixth of the seven." "John Jay grew up and did more than just became a abolitionist he also did things like sign the treaty of Paris to end the American Revolutionary War." "John Jay was best known for being the First Chief Justice of the United States and for helping to write the Federalist Papers."

John Jay's jobs

"Justice is indiscriminately due to all, without regard to numbers, wealth, or rank." -John Jay. "John Jay worked as many different things during his life time including lawyer, abolitionist, Revolutionary, patriot, and many more jobs throughout his life." " John Jay worked as the First Chief Justice of the United States from 1789 to 1795. " "John Jay also wrote 5 of the Federalist Papers along with Alexander Hamilton." "In 1795 John Jay became governor of New York and retired on July 1, 1801."

John's Jay's retirement and death

"John Jay retired in 1801 at the age of 55, he died on May 17, 1829 at the age of 83." "John Jay was buried on a plot on his son Peter's farm in Rye, New York where he spent his childhood." "John Jay lived from 1745-1829, and died 27 years after his wife Sarah Livingston." "John Jay died of palsy most likely caused by a stroke." " John Jay lived for 3 days before dying in Bedford, NY."

John Jay Facts

"John Jay was born to Peter and Mary Jay on December 12, 1745 in New York City, NY."



"John Jay retired from the public at the age of 55 and died at the age of 83."




"John Jay was best known for helping write 5 of the Federalist Papers and for becoming the



first Chief Justice of the United States."




"John Jay died 27 years after his wife (Sarah Livingston) on May 17, 1829 at the age of 83."



"John Jay first became Chief Justice of the United States in 1789 and ended in 1795."

John Jay's life

"John Jay was born on December 12, 1745 to Peter and Mary Jay a wealthy slave owning family." "He had 10 siblings and only 7 of them survived to adulthood, John Jay was the sixth of the seven." "John Jay married Sarah Livingston in 1774 and had his first child Peter Jay in 1776." "John Jay became first Chief Justice of the United States in 1789 the same year his son William Jay was born and gave up his job in 1795." "John Jay became governor of New York in 1795 and retired in 1801 at the age of 55." "John Jay died in 1829 at the age of 83, 27 years after his wife, and was buried on a plot on his son Peter's farm in Rye, New York where he spent his childhood."
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Bibliography


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