Ancient Roman FAQs

Fabiola Bryant

Roman Writing

Roman made their own type of writing. The used animal skins, papyrus and clay tablets to write on. The Nile River provided them with the papyrus.They use stylus to write on the clay and they were coated in wax. The Romans use dried reeds with soot and vegetable gum as ink.

Family

The Roman family is a lot different from your modern family. In Rome the father had all the power in the family. The fathers picked if the children lived or not and they could kill them at any moment. Also the fathers did the working in the family. The mother didn't have much power at all. She just took care of the kids and made sure that they were ready to move out and marry. The kids didn't have any responsibilities until they went to school. That is when they have to being to act like adults and get married.

In the Roman family the names had meanings to them, they were a symbol of social structure and family history. The girls were named after their fathers even if there was more than one girl in the family they would all have their fathers name. The slaves were named after their masers. If their masters name was Aulus, the slave name would be Aulipor, meaning Aulus's boy.

Men Dress Wear

The wealthy men wore togas with a tunica. You could tell if they were wealthy because the clothing was marked. I men also wore rings. Poor men wore rags that were not marked with no jewelry. The sons of the fathers were the same thing as their fathers. They also wore 1 item of clothing with was a bulla ( gold ring). It symbolized that he was a son of a wealthy parent.

Women Dress Wear

Women dressed in long, modest clothing. The were called stolas and they wear palla (cloaks) over them. If they were from a wealthy family they were lots of jewelry. Their hair was usually pulled back with band.

Citations

"Family." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 153-155. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Books and Manuscripts." Ancient Greece and Rome: An Encyclopedia for Students. Ed. Carroll Moulton. Vol. 1. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1998. 98-100. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Children." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 304-305. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Names." The Greenhaven Encyclopedia of Ancient Rome. Don Nardo. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002. 181-182. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

"Clothing." World Eras. Ed. John T. Kirby. Vol. 3: Roman Republic and Empire, 264 B.C.E.- 476 C.E. Detroit: Gale, 2001. 268-271. World History in Context. Web. 6 Oct. 2015.

McManus, Barbara F. "Roman Clothing, Part I." Roman Clothing, Part I. VROMA, Aug. 2003. Web. 14 Sept. 2015.