POSITIVE DISCIPLINE Sept. 4, 2015

Promotion-Prevention-Intervention

Positive School Conflict Solutions


Many students do not know how to handle common problems such as jealousy, threats,

teasing, and physical aggression. These problems often lead to fights that disrupt learning and cause an unpleasant school climate. In a recent study, 73% of middle school students were unable to articulate the key components of managing conflicts and talking out problems. Teaching students keys to managing conflicts successfully can reduce violence in schools and lead to improved academic performance. School-wide conflict

management education, as well as specialized help for students who repeatedly display

violent behavior, are essential components of a comprehensive positive school conflict

prevention program.

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School Fights…What Students Can Do

  • Figure out what methods work for you to control your anger (like leaving a tense situation temporarily or finding a calm person to talk to), and use them before losing control.


  • Before a fight, think about what the consequences of different actions will be: anger and violence versus walking away from a dispute or compromise.


  • Do not carry a gun or other weapons. Weapons escalate conflicts and increase the chances that you will be seriously harmed or that you will accidentally harm someone else. It is also illegal for a minor to carry a handgun, and it can lead to criminal charges and arrest.


  • Never fight with anyone using drugs or alcohol, or likely to have a weapon.


  • When in a conflict, try to think of solutions that will give both sides something, and try to understand your opponent's point of view. Show respect for your opponent's rights and position.


  • Decide on your options for handling the problem, such as talking the problem out calmly with the people involved, avoiding the problem by staying away from certain people, or diffusing the problem by resolving to take it less seriously. Try to use humor to cool hostility.


  • If you feel intensely angry, fearful, or anxious, talk about it with an adult you trust.