Clauses

By: Emily Davidson

What is a Clause?

Clauses are just like simple sentences. They must contain at least a subject and a verb, but also may have an independent or dependant adjective or noun. There are four types of clauses- main clauses, subordinate clauses, relative clauses, and noun clauses

Main Clause

The main clause, also known as the independent clause, must have a subject and a verb as well as a complete thought. In a sentence, there must be at least one main clause.

Subordinate Clause

The subordinate clause, also known as the dependent clause, is a clause that can't stand alone as a sentence because it doesn't have a complete thought. Subordinate clauses have a subject and verb.

Relative Clauses

The relative clause is also known as an adjective clause. It cannot stand alone as a sentence because it doesn't have a complete thought. The relative clause must have three components in order to be a complete relative clause:

1. Must have a subject and verb.

2. Have a relative pronoun or relative adverb.

3. It also works the same as an adjective when asked "What kind?", "How many?" or "Which one?"

Noun Clauses

A noun clauses is a clause that acts as a noun. A noun clause can act as a subject or object, and is considered a dependent clause because it can't stand alone on it's own. Normally, a noun clause is the direct object of a verb and attaches itself to the verb using "that".