1984 By George Orwell

Review By Pedro Alvarez

Plot

Winston Smith Lives in London, or what is left of it after years of constant warfare and government oppression has left of it. Rocket Bombs are constantly demolishing buildings and killing civilians by the dozens. Not much is known of the world before the war started, the government of Oceania has altered all records and of the past making it impossible to know how the past was like before the totalitarian government took over. The Party has also succeeded in brainwashing and constantly monitoring the entire population.they have managed to convince the citizens of any facts or ideas they want, even if the ideas are obviously wrong or contradict each other. The brainwashing has also become strong enough the bonds between people are almost nonexistent; people must become utterly and completely devoted to the party, and if they are not they will disappear and people will forget they ever existed Winston works for the government in a low-level place in the records department in the ministry of truth, which is anything but. Winston spends his days rewriting documents to fit the party's propaganda then incinerating the original copies. But Winston also keeps an illegal diary (Which would get him killed instantly if anyone ever found out) and much dislikes the government. He has heard legends about a mysterious group fighting against the government called "The brotherhood" . But how is Winston to find anybody with thoughts like his when a single a few words or even the suggestion of non-conformity could get him tortured and killed?

Rating:

8/10

I really enjoyed reading this book. through out the whole book there was constant tension due to the possibility of Winston getting caught and killed. I enjoyed reading about how the world works with such an oppressive government. I recommend this book to anyone who is interested in preserving freedom and seeing what happens when freedom is destroyed.

Works cited

Orwell, George. 1984. New York: New American Library, n.d. Print.