Causes of the American Revolution

Joozer Ujjainwala

Proclamation of 1763

The King declared that the settlers would not settle west of Appalachian Mountains after several attacks were made on the settlers by the Indians living in the area. The colonists were angry and simply just ignored it.
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Stamp Act of 1765

After the French and Indian War, The King and the British were in huge debt. Therefore, Prime Minister Greenville proposed the Stamp Act of 1765. The act required the colonists to pay for an official stamp when they bought paper items. Samuel Adams created a society called the Sons of Liberty that protested by using violence to frighten tax collectors. Later, Patrick Henry presented solutions to the Virginia House of Burgesses.
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The Townshend Acts of 1767

The Townshend Acts of 1767 were passed. The act placed duties on glass, lead, paints, paper, and tea. This allowed tax collectors to search for smuggled goods. The colonists once again protested with a group of women called the Daughters of Liberty and others boycotting British goods. Samuel Adams wrote a letter stating that the laws were violating the colonists' rights.
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The Boston Massacre 1770

Many Bostonians saw the British soldiers as a threat by the British government. The tension between the two sides arose on March 5, 1770. A British guard striked a colonist. Then, colonists gathered around and started throwing snowballs and insulting the guards. Soldiers came in and started shooting. Samuel Adams used the battle as propaganda to one side the battle.
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Tea Act of 1773

The British East India Company offered a solution to stop the smuggling of goods and get more tax money. They could directly sell the tea to the colonists at a cheaper price which would equal more tax money. However, the colonists sent the ships back to Britain and wouldn't allow the ships to unload.
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The Boston Tea Party 1773

Samuel Adams and the Sons of Liberty boarded on to three ships disguised as Indians on the night of December 16, 1773. They threw 342 chests of tea out into the water. The protest increased tensions between the British and the colonies.
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The Intolerable Acts of 1774

The Parliament decided to punish Boston by passing the the Intolerable Acts of 1774. The Boston Harbor was closed until Boston paid for the ruined tea. Massachusetts's charter was cancelled and the governor would decide when the legislature could meet. Royal officers accused of crime would be send to Britain where they would trial against a friendly judge. A new Quartering Act was passed that claimed colonists must house British soldiers. The Quebec Act gave Quebec a lot of the land. General Thomas Gage became the new governor of Massachusetts.
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Lexington and Concord 1775

On April 19, British soldiers arrived at Lexington, near Concord, where 70 minutemen waited. Patriot Captain John Parker yelled to his troops not to fire unless the British did. A shot was fired that nobody knows to this day who fired and the battle began. It didn't last very long as the British defeated the minutemen and continued to march on to Concord. Before they reached, Samuel Prescott warned to conceal the remaining weapons. Frustrated by the stockpile's disappearance, the British soldiers set fire to some buildings. The minutemen charged and the British troops had to retreat to Boston losing men along the way.
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