Jim Crow and the Nuremburg Laws

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Jim Crow Laws (OW)

All most all of American states from the 1880's to 1960's enforced segregation through "Jim Crow" laws. All across the country, from North Dakota to Texas, from Delaware to California, cities and states could impose legal punishments on people for associating with members of the other race.1 Forbidding intermarriage and having business owner and public institutions to keep their black and white clientele separated.2

Examples of Jim Crow Laws:

1. It shall not be required that any female nurse to nurse in wards or rooms in the hospital where negro men are placed.3

2. Conductors of trains must assign each person a seat within their division, separated by partition, designated by race.4

3. In restaurants there were partitions separating where blacks and whites ate.

4. Negroes could not play along with white persons or accompany each other at any game of pool or billiards.5


5. Toilets were separated and designated for black and white usages.6


QUOTES

“It shall be unlawful for a negro and white person to play together or in company with each other in any game of cards or dice, dominoes or checkers.”

-Birmingham, Alabama, 1930 7


“Marriages are void when one party is a white person and the other is possessed of one-eighth or more negro, Japanese, or Chinese blood.”

-Nebraska, 1911 8


“Separate free schools shall be established for the education of children of African descent; and it shall be unlawful for any colored child to attend any white school, or any white child to attend a colored school.”


-Missouri, 19299


Jim Crow laws were more than just a series of anti-black regulations though, they were a way of life. African Americans were thought of as second class citizens. 10 Many christian ministers and theologians taught that whites were the chosen people and the God supported racial separation. 11 While blacks were cured to be servants. Whites were thought to be superior to blacks in many important way. Such as intelligence, morality, and civilized behaviors.12


WORKS CITED

1. United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


2.United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


3.United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


4.United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


5.United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


6.United States. National Park Service. "Jim Crow Laws." National Parks Service. U.S. Department of the Interior, 14 Feb. 2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. <http://www.nps.gov/malu/forteachers/jim_crow_laws.htm>.


7."Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal." Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://americanhistory.si.edu/brown/history/1-segregated/jim-crow.html>.


8."Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal." Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://americanhistory.si.edu/brown/history/1-segregated/jim-crow.html>.


9."Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal." Jim Crow Laws - Separate Is Not Equal. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 Mar. 2014. <http://americanhistory.si.edu/brown/history/1-segregated/jim-crow.html>.


10."What Was Jim Crow?" What Was Jim Crow. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ferris.edu/jimcrow/what.htm>.


11."What Was Jim Crow?" What Was Jim Crow. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ferris.edu/jimcrow/what.htm>.


12."What Was Jim Crow?" What Was Jim Crow. N.p., n.d. Web. 06 Mar. 2014. <http://www.ferris.edu/jimcrow/what.htm>.

Nuremberg Laws (SE)

These were a set of race laws in Nazi Germany that were similar to Jim Crow Laws in America. The Nuremberg Laws excluded German Jews from citizenship and also prohibited Jews from marrying or having sexual relations with "German or related blood"(1) A person was considered a Jew if that person had 2 or 3 Jewish grandparents, not just by if they had Jewish beliefs.(2) Even converted Jews that were now Christians were still considered a Jew.(3) Anyone that was a Jew could not even touch a non-Jewish German.(4) Their businesses were taken from them and so were their properties.(5) They also had to carry ID that specifically said that the person was Jew.(6)


WORKS CITED

  1. Jennifer L. Goss, "The Nuremberg Laws of 1935," About. accessed March 6, 2014.
  2. Jennifer L. Goss, "The Nuremberg Laws of 1935," About. accessed March 6, 2014.
  3. "The Nuremberg Race Laws," USHMM. accessed March 6, 2014, http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007695
  4. "The Nuremberg Race Laws," USHMM. accessed March 6, 2014, http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007695
  5. "The Nuremberg Race Laws," USHMM. accessed March 6, 2014, http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007695
  6. "The Nuremberg Race Laws," USHMM. accessed March 6, 2014, http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007695