The Arctic Tundra

By Ayden Reaves

Introduction & Location

The arctic tundra is found across northern Alaska, Canada, and Siberia. This biome has long cold winters and short cool summers. The Arctic tundra has low precipitation (less than 10 inches per year) and dry winds. These conditions make the Arctic tundra a desert-like climate

Flora & Fauna

Not many kinds of animals live year-round in the Arctic tundra. Most birds and mammals only use the tundra as a summer home. Mammals that do live year-round in the tundra include the muskox, Arctic wolf, and brown bear; and each has its own way of adapting to the extreme climatic conditions. The Tundra has a lot of plant life within this biome. Some common plants include the bearberry, arctic moss, Caribou moss, Diamond leafwillow, Labrador Tea, Pasque Flower, and the Tufted Saxifrage. The animals in the tundra eat these plants to survive and gain energy to stay warm. Some plants are useful for humans.

Climate

In the Arctic tundra, the average temperature is 10 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-12 to -6 degrees Celsius), The summer growing season is just 50 to 60 days, when the sun shines 24 hours a day.