Civil War Battles

Kansas Nebraska Act

Kansas Nebraska Act

  • The Kansas Nebraska Act was an 1854 bill that mandated “popular sovereignty”–allowing settlers of a territory to decide whether slavery would be allowed within a new state’s borders.
  • The conflicts that arose between pro-slavery and anti-slavery settlers in the aftermath of the act’s passage led to the period of violence known as Bleeding Kansas, and helped paved the way for the American Civil War 1861-1865.
  • The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 was the third and last of the series of compromises enacted before the u.s. civil war in an attempt to resolve the question of whether slavery should be permitted in the western territories
  • The Kansas-Nebraska Act was passed by the U.S. Congress on May 30, 1854. It allowed people in the territories of Kansas and Nebraska to decide for themselves whether or not to allow slavery within their borders.
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This Is The Fredericksburg Battle

  • Union General Ambrose Burnside did not want command of the Army of the Potomac
  • The Union crossing at Fredericksburg was delayed by a lack of portable pontoon bridge
  • Union forces bombarded Fredericksburg with 150 cannons
  • Lee reacted by entrenching his army on the heights behind the town. On December 11, Union engineers laid five pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock under fire. On the 12th, the Federal army crossed over, and on December 13, Burnside mounted a series of futile frontal assaults on Prospect Hill and Marye’s Heights that resulted in staggering casualties.