The Results of Hiding Jews

Katie Brooks 2

examples of places to hide Jews

Introduction

Back in 1933, when the Holocaust started everyone knew that hiding Jews, Ghettos or the Disabled would come with consequences. Although different places had different consequences they were usually very extreme. In areas that Hitler was not in control of the punishment was less extreme.

What Were The Consequences For The People Who Were Doing The Hiding?

The most common punishment for hiding Jews was death during the Holocaust. For example, in Eastern Europe, the Germans executed not only the people that hid the Jews but their entire family as well. Although, in Western Europe hiding Jews would just get you put in a concentration camp and killed. Though that seems severe, in France you would probably just get arrested and then the consequences after that would differ.Though the punishment differed a little depending on where you were the consequences commonly had to do with death. These severe punishments are why many people did not hide Jews during the Holocaust or only hid a kid.

conculsion

On that note, if someone were to be hiding Jewish people or anyone they weren't supposed to be; and were to have gotten caught the crime was punishable by death. The death sentence may have varied by where you were found hiding them and/or how many you were hiding, but you would most likely be arrested, put in a concentration camp, or killed on the streets. The people that hid the Jewish are very brave and should always be remembered as heroes in the eyes of the people.

Facts

  • Thousands of survived the Holocaust, however, they survived because they were hidden by brave people.
  • World War II ended in 1945, and by then more than 6 million Jewish people had been killed.
  • Denmark was the only country that actively refused to deport its Jewish citizens.
  • Oscar Shindler took control of a factory in German-occupied Poland and then began hiding Jewish people there.
  • Raoul Wallenberg provided tens of thousands of Jews with certification that they were under "protection" of neutral powers.
Holocaust Survivor Remembers Years of Hiding

Further Information

http://www.ushmm.org/learn

If you click the link above it will take you to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Website where you can learn about the Holocaust starting with how Hitler came to power to the very end of it.

www.yadvashem.org

If you click on this link it will take you to another Holocaust Memorial Museum explaining more about how the Holocaust started and what was going on during it.

works cited

Works Cited

Altman, Linda Jacobs. "An Uncertain Freedom." Resisters and Rescuers: Standing up against the Holocaust. Berkeley Heights. NJ: Enslow, 2003. 55-60. Print.

Entrance to the hiding place. Digital image. Anton Sukhinski. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/righteous/stories/sukhinski.asp>.

Hiding jews under baseboards. Digital image. Algemeiner. N.p., n.d. Web. 2 Feb. 2016. <http://www.algemeiner.com/2014/08/22/exclusive-holocaust-hiding-place-for-jewish-sisters-revealed-for-first-time-intact-in-home-of-polish-christian-family-photos/>.

"Holocaust Survivor Remembers Years of Hiding." YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 02 Feb. 2016. <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrQ2GCtBxWQ>.

"The Righteous Among The Nations." About the Righteous. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2016. <http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/righteous/about.asp>.

Sarah. The Secret Annex of the Anne Frank House. Digital image. House Crazy. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016. <http://www.house-crazy.com/the-secret-annex-of-the-anne-frank-house/>.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Death Penalty for Aiding Jews." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. <http://www.ushmm.org/learn/timeline-of-events/1942-1945/german-poster-announces-death-penalty-for-aiding-jews>.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Hidden Children of the Holocaust." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 4 Feb. 2016. <http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10006123>.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. "Rescue in Denmark." United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016. <http://www.ushmm.org/outreach/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007740>.