Racial Discrimination

Racial discrimination is the practice of letting a person's race or skin color unfairly become a factor when deciding who receives a job, promotion, or other employment benefit. It most often affects minority individuals who feel they have been unfairly discriminated against in favor of a Caucasian (or white) individual, but there have been recent cases where whites have claimed that reverse discrimination has occurred that is, the minority received unfairly favorable treatment at the expense of the white individual.


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Racial discrimination is a high-profile issue in the business world and is a very real problem that still exists—and in some cases is getting worse. The law stated that it was unlawful for an employer to "fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual, or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual's race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.



In 1991, the 1964 law was significantly amended for the first time by the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1991. The law was passed to override several Supreme Court decisions that had made it much more difficult for employees to prove that racial discrimination had occurred.


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Discrimination exists in modern American society to the same extent which discrimination exists anywhere. A strand of discrimination which remains particularly strong in American society today exists towards the Arabic population. Racial profiling remains an issue which thoughtfulness to everyone's equal opportunity must be applied.

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