Winds

Global & Local Winds Windfo (It's like info, but with wind!)

General Windfo

Wind is sideways movement of air from an area of high pressure to an area to low pressure in the atmosphere. It is caused by the difference in pressure in the Earth's atmosphere. You can't see wind, but you can definitely feel it. It adds to the weather around you. For example, if it is 50 degrees outside without any wind, but with a high wind speed, it could feel like 40 or 45 degrees. Also, wind can be in the form of natural disasters, like hurricanes, cyclones, or tornadoes.

Local and Global Winds

Local Winds Windfo

Local winds are winds that blow over a course of small areas. Local winds are caused by the unequal heating of the Earth's surface over a small area. Types of local winds are the shore breezes, which are sea breezes and the land breezes. Sea breezes blow from the sea, where the air pressure is higher and the temperature is lower, inland, where the air pressure is lower and the temperature is higher. Sea breezes only occur during the daytime. Land breezes, however, only happen in the evening. They blow from the land, where the air pressure is higher and the temperature is lower, out towards the sea, where the air pressure is lower, and the temperature is higher.

Global Winds Windfo

Global winds are winds that span large areas, all over the globe (hence the name of them, GLOBAL). They come in the forms of Trade Winds, Prevailing Westerlies, Polar Easterlies, and Jet Streams. Trade winds are winds that blow from about 30 degrees north and south of the Equator, at the horse latitudes, towards the Equator. Horse latitudes are calm areas with little wind, at about 30 degrees north and south of the Equator. They are called the horse latitudes because when people were sailing there once, there wasn't enough food for the horses, and the horses were thrown overboard. Next, there are the Prevailing Westerlies. The Prevailing Westerlies blow opposite of the Trade Winds, away from the Horse Latitudes in the opposite direction. In the Northern Hemisphere the Prevailing Westerlies blow northern, and in the Southern Hemisphere they blow southern. Lastly, there are the Polar Easterlies. The Polar Easterlies blow cold air away from the north and south Poles.