The Seven Days

Jose Diaz, Jr

Location

Near Richmond Virginia, during the American Civil War
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Forces Involved

Union - 103,000

Confederate - 92,000

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Outcome

Confederate won
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Significance

The Seven Day's Battles were important because, despite heavy losses, the Confederate army under Robert E. Lee not only prevented George B. McClellan's Union army from capturing Richmond, but also drove them into retreat down the Virginia Peninsula.


The Seven Days Battles ended the Peninsula Campaign. The Army of the Potomac encamped around Berkeley Plantation. The Union defensive position was a strong one that Lee did not consider attacking, withdrawing instead to the defenses of Richmond. With its back to the James River, the army was protected by Union gunboats, but suffered heavily from heat, humidity, and disease. In August, they were withdrawn by order of President Lincoln to reinforce the Army of Virginia for the Second Battle of the Bull Run.

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Commanders

General Lee and George Brinton McClellan
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Casualties

Both sides suffered heavy casualties. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia suffered about 20,000 casualties (3,494 killed, 15,758 wounded, and 952 captured or missing) out of a total of over 90,000 soldiers during the Seven Days. McClellan reported casualties of about 16,000 (1,734 killed, 8,062 wounded, and 6,053 captured or missing) out of a total of 105,445. Despite their victory, many Confederates were stunned by the losses.
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