LHE Dyslexia Newsletter

April Edition 2022

Springtime is a wonderful reminder that hard work results in great growth. Our students are continually striving and growing in their reading and spelling skills. It is a tremendous joy to see them blossom into confident students.


Please consider donating a bag of candy or treasures to our treasure box. As we approach the end of the year our supplies are getting low and these small rewards are always enjoyed by our students. Thank you for all that you do to support our amazing students. Happy Spring!

Dyslexia Advice for Parents

Watch a powerful new video featuring YCDC Co-Director Dr. Sally Shaywitz as she delves into her award-winning book OVERCOMING DYSLEXIA (2nd Edition) and answers questions for parents & educators as they head back-to-school during uncertain times. Hosted by KPJR films, tens of thousands of people have already watched this “fireside chat” and the reviews have been extraordinary. One person said Overcoming Dyslexia “should be required reading.” Another called it “sensational."

Dyslexia Advice for Parents
Big picture
Big picture

Did you know?

If you are a movie fan, you have likely seen a movie or a preview for a movie by DreamWorks. It is one of the most successful film studios in Hollywood. But did you know that three dyslexics started the studio? It was started in 1994 by media moguls Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg, and David Geffen (together SKG) to make a live action film and animation studio.

TEST ANXIETY: CAN IT BE TREATED?

Is it possible to overcome test anxiety?

Answer From Craig N. Sawchuk, Ph.D., L.P.



Several strategies can reduce test anxiety and increase your performance on test day.

A little nervousness before a test is normal and can help sharpen your mind and focus your attention. But with test anxiety, feelings of worry and self-doubt can interfere with your test-taking performance and make you miserable. Test anxiety can affect anyone, whether you're a primary or secondary school student, a college student, or an employee who has to take tests for career advancement or certification.


Here are some strategies that may help reduce your test anxiety:

  • Learn how to study efficiently. Your school may offer study-skills classes or other resources that can help you learn study techniques and test-taking strategies. You'll feel more relaxed if you systematically study and practice the material that will be on a test.
  • Study early and in similar places. It's much better to study a little bit over time than cramming your studying all at once. Also, spending your time studying in the same or similar places that you take your test can help you recall the information you need at test time.
  • Establish a consistent pretest routine. Learn what works for you, and follow the same steps each time you get ready to take a test. This will ease your stress level and help ensure that you're well-prepared.
  • Talk to your teacher. Make sure you understand what's going to be on each test and know how to prepare. In addition, let your teacher know that you feel anxious when you take tests. He or she may have suggestions to help you succeed.
  • Learn relaxation techniques. To help you stay calm and confident right before and during the test, perform relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing, relaxing your muscles one at a time, or closing your eyes and imagining a positive outcome.
  • Don't forget to eat and drink. Your brain needs fuel to function. Eat the day of the test and drink plenty of water. Avoid sugary drinks such as soda pop, which can cause your blood sugar to peak and then drop, or caffeinated beverages such as energy drinks or coffee, which can increase anxiety.
  • Get some exercise. Regular aerobic exercise, and exercising on exam day, can release tension.
  • Get plenty of sleep. Sleep is directly related to academic performance. Preteens and teenagers especially need to get regular, solid sleep. But adults need a good night's sleep, too, for optimal work performance.
  • Don't ignore a learning disability. Test anxiety may improve by addressing an underlying condition that interferes with the ability to learn, focus or concentrate — for example, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or dyslexia. In many cases, a student diagnosed with a learning disability is entitled to assistance with test taking, such as extra time to complete a test, testing in a less distracting room or having questions read aloud.
  • See a professional counselor, if necessary. Talk therapy (psychotherapy) with a psychologist or other mental health professional can help you work through feelings, thoughts and behaviors that cause or worsen anxiety. Ask if your school has counseling services or ask if your employer offers counseling through an employee assistance program.

LHE Dyslexia Webpage

We are beginning to build our dyslexia webpage. It can be found on the LHE webpage under Campus Services. We will begin by posting all newsletters on the page. Click on this link to visit the page.
Big picture
Have a Question Related to Dyslexia at LHE?

please use this form to submit your questions

Contact Your LHE Dyslexia Teachers and Therapists